auditions

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by lemmon13, Nov 14, 2009.

  1. lemmon13

    lemmon13 New Friend

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    Mar 7, 2009
    i have an audition comming up this week and always tense up and get nervous during it and i can never play like i do when i practice at home...how can i change this
     
  2. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Story of my life... :bash:
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    It all has to do with attitude. There is no set way as the reasons for the nervousness are very diversified.

    Proper and thorough preparation are key. You need to have this 100% sewn up a week BEFORE the audition.

    Experience is also a big part. Having a decent daily routine is also important. During the audition you don't practice any of the stuff coming up - it was already finished a week earlier.

    On stage you need to breathe like you have practiced. That is where most go wrong. They do not mark the required literature with breathing marks and train it that way. Once your breathing is out of synch, audition over! Practice breathing when you should, not when you have no other choice!

    For nerves, I make sure that I eat before having to play anything important. It kind of takes the nervous edge off!
     
  4. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Robin,

    I would emphasize on the experience part. I did no audition for about 3-4 years and just blew one off, because it seems that I had forgotten what it felt like. I think that my preparation was OK but when I went on stage and started playing almost everything that could do wrong, it did...well, I got the High D flat on Haydn right. As you pointed out, the breathing is the first basic thing....I wanted to play as practiced, but the adrenalin was probably more that I could handle in that moment... :stars: the examining conductor was a complete jerk, but that's another story...Mostly afterwards I was mad at myself, though I can't deny I was frustrated with him too. Just needed to vent it out. :sorry:
     
  5. RB-R37297

    RB-R37297 Pianissimo User

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    Mar 12, 2009
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    The number one best thing you can do for yourself is have your audition material down. Period. End of discussion. Mistakes will probably creep in due to stage fright during the audition depending on how your nerves are. The last thing you want is underpreparation giving you mistakes that will be compounded further by stage fright.

    I tend to shake a lot when on stage, especially during the beginning of a show or a piece. What I do to calm myself down is either close my eyes and just listen to myself and what's going on around me musically or I pick a spot on the back wall and I play to that spot. Helps me cut down on the crowd factor.

    If it's a "HOLY CRAP PRESSURE PRESSURE PRESSURE DO GOOD DO GOOD DO GOOD" sort of stage fright, I do my best to turn off that panicky voice in my head by focusing on the music and the music alone and not letting my mind wander to other places - specificially What-Will-Happen-If-I-Mess-Up-That-Figureville, I-Hope-The-Crowd/Adjudicator-Likes-Metown, and Oh-God-Please-Get-Me-Out-Of-Hereburg.
     
  6. Graham

    Graham Pianissimo User

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    Jun 8, 2008
    Melbourne, Australia
    I just had 2 days of performance: day one, end-of-year recital of my final year of my music degree. day two, parade through the city followed by an orchestral audition. Stressful!

    One thing my teacher told me, and I tried out is EATING BANANAS. This seems to help with nerves, and make you feel a bit better due to their nutritional value! Don't know if it was a placebo effect, but it helped!
     
  7. Jurandr

    Jurandr Pianissimo User

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    Take a faux audition in front of a random stranger. Just pull one off the street!
    Lacking a stranger you can always ask your band director pull a mock audition with you. He'll offer some nice advice and if you do a few of them it will really help you out in the real thing.
     
  8. Pedal C

    Pedal C Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 24, 2005
    Try to practice the audition just as it will be. Go outside of your normal practice area and wait around for a few minutes, then go in and play it down. Whatever is least secure will be revealed and that will help guide you in your practice. Get people to listen, if possible. If you want to try to eat something before, or eat a banana or whatever, practice this too, because the last thing you want to do is find out the day of the audition that bananas make your mouth dry or something! For me, I don't eat for an hour or two before playing anything important because lot of things make my lips feel puffy after I eat, but the point is you have to try to use your practice to try to figure out what works for YOU!
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Most big deals in this world are made while golfing.

    Realize that the school, the orchestra has an agenda. They have something that YOU want. Your personality has to show them that you have something that THEY want.

    Lemmon 13 may have given us a reason why they would NOT want him if he has just started preparing this week....................

    Opportunities to train confidence:
    make speeches in public
    play duets in public (in a park, train station, etc)
    Volunteer for things that you DON'T like
    make a list of your strength and weaknesses - start working on the latter

    The seed for chaos is DOUBT.

    Nick,
    whether the audition was run by a jerk or not is of no significance. If they have something that you want, even HE has to be convinced.

    There are only 2 things that you can offer in a situation like that: YOUR playing and YOUR personality. They CAN remain constant, even in the company of jerks.

    Our signature is our character.
     
  10. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Though I must agree with the above, I don't see any education point in this. A personality is not something that one can change as easily as a mouthpiece, horn, articulation or style.

    Few years ago I had an audition for an extra trumpet in a world known orchestra that I will not name at this time, but seems that I got turned down solely for personality reasons. After I found out the outcome I asked for a adjudicators resume on my performance. It didn't say anything substantial about my sound, style or instrumental technique or style, just that I wouldn't "blend" with their trumpet section. I asked my teacher to decipher that "code", but he couldn't say anything that makes sense other than "If they want to turn down someone this is the ultimate excuse".
     

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