Avoiding Mute Dents

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by RHSbigbluemarchingband, Apr 10, 2012.

  1. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    Reminds me of these pics of 2 headed snakes and other oddities...
     
  2. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Inappropriate suggestion to make to a young lady methinks - how the hell is she gunna explain that to her parents? - "Oh Mom/Dad, I just need it to mute the horrible clanging sound ......"
     
  3. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    The Wide Brown Land
    I wonder if the mutes need to be in better reach. I have recently purchased a "Silent Mute Stand" from BrassAid which allows all my mutes to sit just below the shelf on the music tray - they are there, in plain sight, within easy reach, and changeovers can be very fast.

    http://www.brassaid.com/
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2012
  4. nieuwguyski

    nieuwguyski Forte User

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    I wouldn't think a harmon-type mute would be obvious suspect for causing mute dings -- the edge is a fairly large radius, and there's no reason the cork can't extend all the way to the end of the metal. My straight mute is a Denis Wick, with felt on the end. My cup is a H&B "stonelined," which should be softer than the bell...

    All that said, I have inflicted one or two mute dings on horns over the years. I view them as minor, inevitable, annoying occurrences. I use a mute holder ( Mute Master ) whenever I play a show, and there are still times that I need to drop a mute in my lap while snatching the next. Could the problem mainly be reduced scores?

    The most painful mute dent I've inflicted is on the bell of my '56 Martin Committee -- with a harmon-type mute, as I claimed should be nearly impossible. The harmon fell out of my mute-holder and bounced off the Committee, sitting on a stand below, when I bumped into my stand when reaching for my flugel. Oh well, there's honor in combat scars...
     
  5. RHSbigbluemarchingband

    RHSbigbluemarchingband Mezzo Piano User

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    My harmon hasn't scarred it, but my cup mute (exact same as yours) has done its fair amount of damage to the horn, along with my straight mute. Neither of which have felt at the top.
     
  6. RHSbigbluemarchingband

    RHSbigbluemarchingband Mezzo Piano User

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    That might actually help me and my short arms when it comes to this lol. I'm pretty small (5ft tall) and my arms are short to the point where if it says to use a plunger, I can't because I can't reach the end of the horn......
     
  7. RHSbigbluemarchingband

    RHSbigbluemarchingband Mezzo Piano User

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    Yeah I don't know how I'd explain my way out of that one..
     
  8. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    If you can, and have the luxury of more than one player on each part, sometimes you can work out a tag team system for those impossible switch out times.
    We do that occasionally in our band, but that is a big wind band that has 2 or three trumpets on a part. Yes, I agree with gmonady (what else is new) these composers need a course to get their priorities straight regarding the lofty position of prominence of the trumpet. And of course the respect that follows.:roll:
     
  9. RHSbigbluemarchingband

    RHSbigbluemarchingband Mezzo Piano User

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    Well in Overture to Candide, the other person on the lead part with me will play this one lick and then to avoid the quarter rest mute change (in cut), I put my mute in during that lick, and it works out, but some parts just aren't that easy. There's another thing where its a fortissimo section (actually most of the piece is) and it requires an insanely fast mute out and throw on floor (more mute dents) and play within a measure. It would be fine if I could reach the end of the bell without taking my horn off my face. Two beats is a rather short amount of time to remove the horn, the mute, and then take in a huge amount of air, and put horn on the face with my embouchere set and then play. Oh Bernstein.....

    And then there are pit orchestras with two or three trumpets total....
     
  10. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    I think this is a clear case for a trumpet-y sounding cornet. Or maybe a pocket trumpet with a full-sized bell.

    Tom
     

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