B5 Question For theoldmaz

Discussion in 'Horns' started by BrassClass, Apr 30, 2004.

  1. BrassClass

    BrassClass New Friend

    18
    0
    Apr 2, 2004
    Someone told me a while back that the material used in the bell of the B5 is different than the other ML bells - copper content or something. Can you provide any comments on that? The B5 sure is a great sounding horn!

    All comments appreciated.
     
  2. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

    4,529
    8
    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
  3. theoldmaz

    theoldmaz New Friend

    17
    1
    Jan 30, 2004
    Oak Park, Illinois
    B5 bell material

    Back in the 60's when I began working for Mr. Schilke and he conceived the B5 and B6, both used bells purchased from Conn and thinned down to his specifications on a wet belt-sander. He did the work himself because he didn't trust any of us to do it right. He'd be covered in wet copper dust when he finished a batch. So we were all alot happier when we began to get the bells made to our specifications from Anderson Silver Plating, Inc. They required much less reworking and were more consistant overall. Anderson's still supply us with high quality blanks for our non-brass models and also the new sterling silver bells which are begining to generate some serious interest inspite of their somewhat high cost.
     
  4. bkmdano

    bkmdano New Friend

    33
    0
    Nov 13, 2003
    TheOldMaz,

    I've always wondered what the thought process was while developing each of the Schilke models. What was Mr Schilke trying to accomplish with each model and did he achieve his goal on each of the models. There are varying opinions on the characteristics of each model, however when buying a Schilke, the descriptions and opinions aren't much help without playing the horns. I guess what I'm trying to ask is why was each model was developed and does each model meet the goal of the Schilke Co.?
     
  5. theoldmaz

    theoldmaz New Friend

    17
    1
    Jan 30, 2004
    Oak Park, Illinois
    New Models

    It's quite simple,really. Each new model was the direct result of someone asking for a horn that played a little differently than the B1, B2 and B3 that were available when I started working there in '62. He'd experiment with prototypes for as long as it took to get one that he liked. Then he'd have some of his students try the new horn because he knew that first-rate professional players made the worst testers since they unconciously compensate for design problems and intonation anomalies. If a weak player sounded good on a particular horn, he'd keep it around and causally let the really major people in the business try it when they came through the shop for some mouthpiece work. Pretty soon, we'd put a model number on it and dealers would start to ask for them because so and so was at the shop a while back and tried this new horn Schilke was making and thought it was great and "Could you send us a few?" and so on...
     

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