Bach 182

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Rich Wetzel, Nov 27, 2008.

  1. Rich Wetzel

    Rich Wetzel Pianissimo User

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    Dec 27, 2003
    Tacoma, WA
    I was formerly a clinician and artist for another wonderful trumpet and then about a year and a half ago, Bobby Thorpe from Synergy Brass, Jeff Christiana, product manager for Conn-Selmer trumpets and trombones, were all in Elkhart, Indiana.

    Bobby and Jeff kept raving to me about this 182. I had no intention at the time of trying or switching to a new horn. I had always played extra large bore horns, and to my surprise, this thing just felt absolutely effortless to play, had that gorgeous Bach sound, intonation, and it just rang like crazy in the upper register too!

    I thought that maybe it is just that one day honeymoon thing, so tried it the next day, and the next, and by that Friday I said, "I must have this trumpet". Every day it just played and sounded so fantastic, had that unique gorgeous Bach sound and was so good in all registers and specifically up high, which for the big band lead stuff I do is absolutely perfect.

    Over the years, like a lot of my friends, I always felt like I was trading off that gorgeous core sound to try to find something that would ring just a bit more up high. No trade off here, it sounds absolutely beautiful in all registers and rings like crazy on the high stuff too!

    I know I sound really enthusiastic, cause I am, I love this thing!
     
  2. Brass crusader

    Brass crusader Mezzo Piano User

    Congratulations on the new horn! What specs make it different from a standard 37? Or, what is special or unique to this model?
     
  3. Trumpet guy

    Trumpet guy Forte User

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    Feb 9, 2008
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    looks like it's a light weight body with standard weight strad 37 parts around it. And it's made in some factory in Ohio instead of the Elkhart factory in Indiana.
     
  4. Rich Wetzel

    Rich Wetzel Pianissimo User

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    Dec 27, 2003
    Tacoma, WA
    That's right. It is a light weight body with a 37 bell on it. Bach, Conn, King, Benge, etc, are all part of Conn-Selmer, Inc. Most Bach's are built in Elkhart Indiana and the 182 is built in Eastlake Ohio using the same processes as Elkhart, the main plant directors and product managers go back and forth, more sharing of ideas, etc... Truly feels and plays fantastic, has that characteristic gorgeous Bach core sound in all registers and in particular, the very noticable aspect is it rings like crazy and still sounds gorgeous in the high end too, feels very easy to play, great feel, intonation, and the sound is just amazing!

    I absolutely love it!
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Do we have an impartial opinion. I respect Rich, but he is a "Bach Trumpet Artist and Clinician". I'll bet that they really had to TWIST his arm to get him to try this horn.

    I played through most of the Bach trumpets at the Musikmesse in Frankfurt, Germany last year and nothing stuck out like this. Something this hot would have surely drawn attention to itself. I will make a point of it in March next year to look for this ax. It is about time that Bach did something new.

    The best Bachs that I have ever played were the ones rebuilt by René Spada in Switzerland. He turns even plain vanilla ML 37s into something HOT!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  6. Rich Wetzel

    Rich Wetzel Pianissimo User

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    Dec 27, 2003
    Tacoma, WA
    I am sure you will get other opinions, but at the time I tried it I was an artist for another trumpet. I realize some will take it with a grain of salt, but truthfully, everyone I have had try it, both mine or last year several player friends at the NAMM show, it was the buzz of the show, truly a great horn.

    At the NAMM show last January in Anaheim, CA it did attract a lot of attention from a lot of players.

    In the end, these recommendations serve to get you to try it, and make your own judgement.
     
  7. nordlandstrompet

    nordlandstrompet Forte User

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    I might have lost an important point here, but my sincere opinion is that a
    Bach is built exclusively by Bach, so the best Bach you have ever tried
    is a trumpet with Bach body and Spada soul? :-?
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hej Nordlands,
    René strips the horns down, puts them back together with a swiss watchmakers precision and makes it with a removable tuning bell. Bach sound, better response and intonation. He has just identified the manufacturing errors and corrected them. I am surprised that Bach never woke up to this.

    The Bach soul on their own standard production is smeared all over the map. Definitely not a brand where you can buy blind! Play before you pay!
     
  9. Rich Wetzel

    Rich Wetzel Pianissimo User

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    Dec 27, 2003
    Tacoma, WA
    I am sorry Rowuk, in all due respect there are a lot of great players who would disagree with you on that. I absolutely respect you, I just disagree on this one point.

    I know you will say that my opinion is swayed by being a clinician for Bach, but truly they are outstanding off the line and played as such by some of the greatest players in the world.

    In the end, we all have our preferences, likes and dislikes, I just think it is not an accurate thing to characterize Bach in that light when clearly so many great players would say otherwise.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2008
  10. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Rich,

    have you heard anything about major changes that UMI may be planning for Bach? There are some ugly rumors floating around
     

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