Bach Strad Model 37

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetfart123, Jun 1, 2013.

  1. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

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    Hi

    Just wondering which years are good for this model of Strad.

    Many thanks
     
  2. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    The Bach strike lasted from April 1, 2006 until around June 2009. Some folks say they have never played a bad Bach and have not noticed a change in quality during the strike. However, I would tend to avoid from that period. Also, on Strads, typically the Older the better. Personally, I think there is variation in sound and playability from horn to horn, even of the same year. The variability you are looking at is year to year.

    A couple of weeks ago I picked up an 82 Strad. Gorgeous tone, but starts getting quite tight above the staff. That doesn't mean it can't play high - just the player needs to realize it is tight there. I have other Strads that don't seem to have quite the tone, but are easier up high. Best of luck.
     
  3. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

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    Cheers Steve, I am wanting one which is good with high notes but has a great tone.. You have some collection of trumpets, what others would you recommend. I will do alot of classical and alot of salsa maybe i need two trumpets?
     
  4. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Realize that some will say otherwise, but many think Bachs tend to be tight in the upper range. The Bach sound is the selling point for most. I play second in jazz bnad and typically swap my strad for an Olds Super for it. Other horns you might want to look at include the Kanstul 991 - older ones have Mariachi on the bell. They are Kanstuls copy/improvement of the Conn Constellation - played by Maynard and Cat Anderson, among others. Big wide sound. Gorgeous horn (go to the Kanstul site to see one).

    Another really nice horn is the Kanstul 1500 which works well with classical. More open than a Strad. Again, all are great horns so it really comes down to which fits you the best.
     
  5. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    May I suggest you not worry about supposed general characteristics associated with vintages and rely upon your own experiences? Take that mouthpiece that seems most effective for you and try some Strads with an open mind - maybe not even asking about year of manufacture. Listen carefully to yourself. Settle upon that one that pleases you the most, whether it is an MV or strike horn, and then play it like crazy and become that trumpet player you want to be.

    My approach was different from the above suggestion. I read a lot about Strads here on TM and other places, and considered the fact that this trumpet has been manufactured since the early 20th century right up until today. I decided I wanted a 180S37 in excellent used condition. I shopped, exercised patience, and ended up buying a horn made in 2000 that was in "like new" condition. Having a good idea of the effect and priority of the mouthpiece in this player-trumpet-mouthpiece triad, I experimented and obtained a wonderfully responsive combination; I seem to be limited only by my own capacity to grow and advance as a player.

    Good luck in your Strad quest.

    Jim
     
  6. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

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    Many thanks Steve and Jim for your information, it's great to have this resource, with seasoned trumpeters sharing their experience. I like the idea of the Kantul Trumpets but also like the idea of the strad 180s37. I have seen alot of these on ebay and they look great.

    Thanks again. Oh, there is a trumpeter who plays with Eddie Palmieri Gordon I think he is called, am gonna have a look to see what he plays.

    Thanks again
    Antony
     
  7. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Comeback has good advice. It is fine to look to see what someone else plays, but just realize that what is good for another may not work for you. Example- Maynard Ferguson played a Constellation - essentially the Kanstul 991. Worked great for him- yet it is he least used of my horns as it doesn't work that good for me.

    Bachs are fine horns- they work great for a lot of folks and not so much for others. That said, it is really hard to go wrong with a Strad. You always might find something better but a Strad is fine for any up and coming player. You really need to spend time at a music shop playing several different horns so you can see how they respond to you. Try other guys horns in the band.

    If you are buying off eBay, realize that there is going to be some variability,especially with Strads. That said, it is hard to go wrong with a Strad. I am going to assume you are a fairly young player. Bachs are a common choice. Again, the best thing you can do is hit the music stores and try a few. Best of luck.
     
  8. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

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    Nice one Steve, alot of players are saying the same. I think I have to go to London, as we are a bit short for choice here in Dublin Republic of Ireland.
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    A good Bb will work on all styles. A shallower mouthpiece should help for the salsa sound.
     
  10. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

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    Hi I have a Denis Wicks shallow mouthpiece, which has transformed my player, it sounds alot more brighter and easier to get high notes
     

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