Bach Stradivarius Maintenance Help!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by TrumpetSaiyan777, Jun 5, 2013.

  1. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Tone Maggots grow inside brass instruments, and if left unchecked, will crawl into the player's mouth.

    [​IMG]

    Works with Junior High School students! Point is, keeping a trumpet clean on the inside is much more important than keeping it clean on the outside.
     
  3. TrumpetSaiyan777

    TrumpetSaiyan777 New Friend

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    Thanks again everyone for your great help, I'll take into account all of this when taking care of my horn. I just had a few more questions, and sorry again if I'm not the smartest on maintenance, but I know this will be a learning process for the better.

    - When I wash my horn monthly, should I be giving it a bath in warm water? And does that have any deteriorating effects on the silver of the Strad? Or am I supposed to go about cleaning my Trumpet another way?

    - My Strad came with a 3M Anti-Tarnish Strip, but I'm not really sure how to use it. Do I just leave it inside my case?

    - Tomorrow I'll stop by Graner and hopefully buy a snake brush for the slides. Should I use the same snake brush on the leadpipe?

    Sorry I'm asking so many questions, I appreciate all the help and advice.
     
  4. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Never TOO many questions - ask until you understand thoroughly - we are exceptionally tolerant if we perceive you to be genuine.

    - When I wash my horn monthly, should I be giving it a bath in warm water?
    Silver trumpets can get a bath in hot water with dishwashing detergent (not the stuff you put in a dishwashing machine though - the stuff you use in the sink when doing the washing up by hand.
    And does that have any deteriorating effects on the silver of the Strad?
    Won't hurt your silver trumpet - hot water should definitely NOT be used on a lacquered trumpet.
    Or am I supposed to go about cleaning my Trumpet another way?
    A proper trumpet cleaning kit including non metallic snake, valve brush, mouthpiece brush and good drying cloth are ideal.

    - My Strad came with a 3M Anti-Tarnish Strip, but I'm not really sure how to use it. Do I just leave it inside my case?
    I don't know about Anti-Tarnish Strips.

    - Tomorrow I'll stop by Graner and hopefully buy a snake brush for the slides. Should I use the same snake brush on the leadpipe?
    Snake the leadpipe, bigger slides and tubing, and the bell pipe - be careful with small slides
    Let you trumpet soak in hot soapy water, use the snake, try to do this underwater and you'll see the crap come out into the wash water.
    Run the parallel valve brush trough the valve casings.
    Use the tapered mouthpiece brush through your mouthpiece.
    Rinse very very thoroughly in clean water.
    Allow to dry, and then polish out the water marks with your cloth.
    Lubricate slides and valves with oil and slide grease as applicable.
    DO NOT GET THE FELT IN THE VALVES WET.

    There are plenty of threads on trumpet cleaning - seek and ye shall be rewarded.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2013
  5. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Congrats on the horn. Be sure to thank your parents. That cost a few bucks but will likely last you a lifetime with proper care.

    I use Dawn dish washing detergent. Dawn is great for removing the oil that gets on horns from your hands and also breaks down crud. Soak 15 minutes. Use brushes (snake), then rinse well. Run water down the bell and in each pipe. Then towel. Do all this in a large container- sink or tub.

    Do NOT put your valves in with the horn. The corks, felts etc. on the valve stem area should not get wet. I use a plastic cup. Fill with water and Dawn until it covers the port area of the valves. They make a brush sized for cleaning the ports. Rinse very well.

    Whatever slide grease you use, be sure to also put on threads for valve caps and valve bottom covers. Do NOT get inside valve casing.

    If you need to buy slide grease, know that there are those who use various brands, there is the vasoline crowd, etc. all work. Last week I was in a repair shop getting my tuning slide brace repaired on a Strad. Had been playing a rehearsal and noticed it kept slowly sliding out as I played (over an inch). Turns out there was a break at one of the rings on the brace that was almost impossible to see. Anyway, the master tech showed me what he uses. STP oil treatment (small blue bottle which says "contains ZDDP anti wear agents." Live and learn.

    If you haven't already bought a snake, be aware there are some foam like snakes that are being made as opposed to the bristle brush type. I like the former. They compress as you pull them through the pipes and do a great job cleaning. They also have a plastic "leader" that doesn't scratch the horn and is easy to thread through the tubes. You may also want to get you a small mouthpiece brush. More junk accumulates in the mouthpiece than anywhere else.

    Again, congrats on the horn.
     
  6. Harky

    Harky Pianissimo User

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    I may have mis-read this but are you sure you want to say, "...hot water should definitely be used on a laquered trumpet..." ?
     
  7. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

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    As Harky points out, HOT water will strip some lacquers, especially on older horns. An acquaintance of mine stripped the lacquer off his trombone in college. He put it in some hot water and then got called away to a frat party. He came back to a trombone and a lacquer "skin" which was lying under it. Imagine his surprise.
     
  8. Harky

    Harky Pianissimo User

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    I am sure that the writer meant to put "NOT" in front of the hot water and lacquered horns and it was just a typo. We do have a lot of younger players who have not read the multitude of posts and warnings about warm water only for lacquered horns. Many of us take that for granted. In the more is better society I can only imagine a youngster or even an oldster thinking, "if warm water takes out the crud, hot water will take out even more crud (very technical term)!" BTW = it will :D.... the lacquer. Also it was good that one of the posters noted to not get the felts and corks wet in the valves. Nobody told me that when I was first learning. So much to learn, so little time.
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I cleaned my cornet the same day I inhaled through it and had a Tone Maggot hit the back of my throat. Following instructions, I didn't submerge the valves, but rather pulled the crud out with my little finger. I didn't realize the valves were numbered (they were at the top of the valve, beneath a cork) and had to try out most all of the six combinations before getting it right.
     
  10. Harky

    Harky Pianissimo User

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    Yeah... same for me. In 5th grade I cleaned my horn for the first time and did not know what the numbers were on those things with the holes in them. After a tirade by my father about me screwing up that thing (new, first horn) and about a half an hour of mix and match I finally got it okay. THEN it was several years (like ten) that I found out that the valve guides had two different side ears or tabs on them and that it actually matters which way they went in. Who would have known? Of course we are all a lot smarter now, right? :-?
     

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