Bach T300.... student trumpet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Bridget1513, Apr 29, 2013.

  1. Bridget1513

    Bridget1513 New Friend

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    Apr 23, 2013
    Texas
    Thank you everyone for the advice, I will be giving some of these a try.... the trumpet is not silver-plated, but it seems to me, that if it were, things would be a lot easier :dontknow:.... Once I figure out what will work, I will most definitely post back with an update :-)
     
  2. arlington

    arlington Pianissimo User

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    Aug 14, 2012
    Lancaster, OH
    Whoa whoa whoa! He said the trumpet is not silver plated. You can forget any advice that was given in previous posts as to follow them you will surely ruin your instrument. You have two choices. A. Leave it alone. B. Take the trumpet to a local NAPBIRT certtfied repair shop and follow their advice. There is nothing that YOU can do. The likely remedy to this situation will be to accept the tarnish. Otherwise you can get into all kinds of costly repairs relacquering an instrument that will cost more than the instrument is worth. I repeat. DO NOT FOLLOW the others advice as they all assumed you were dealing with a silver plated instrument.
     
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I didn't assume a Bach TR300 would be silver-plated. What a waste of silver! ;-) I certainly stand by remarks regarding the cleaning and polishing of this instrument. TR300's are fairly common and there is already a cosmetic issue that doesn't affect the playability of the horn. He has nothing to lose and money to save.
     
  4. arlington

    arlington Pianissimo User

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    You told him to use brasso on a lacquered instrument which is a no no. I stand by my comments.
     
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Right! On the tarnished area! You have to work hard to get the tarnish off. You are not going to get epoxy lacquer off with brasso. I have done this on many of my lacquered horns and the results are good. The Blitz works slower and is messy.
     
  6. arlington

    arlington Pianissimo User

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    Do what you want op. Its your horn.
     
  7. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    arlington makes very valid observations which I too covered in my previous post to Bridget

    (doesn't sound much like a bloke's name does it? - just saying.)
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I just added the emphasis for effect. It's a TR300 (worth less than a CHEAP re lacquer job). It's used and unsightly/ugly. He wants the tarnish gone. It's already messed up (the lacquer 's gone and the brass is tarnished). It could be a project for father/daughter time. I will add, use a decent car wax on the cleaned ares so it won't tarnish as quickly. It's a Tr300, not a Strad.
     
  9. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I have used MAAS on these lacquer student horns. Normally the lacquer will not come off if you are careful. If it does then it would come off by simply rubbing anyway. Then the car wax for protection.
    I am not a fan of brasso except on the slides ( the non lacquer part) if they are severely tarnessed and then I go over them again with MAAS.
    If the lacquer if too far gone then I just remove it altogether and polish it up.
     
  10. jimc

    jimc Mezzo Piano User

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    Whoa! Aluminum is harder than silver, and will scratch unless you are very careful. (Ask me how I know!) The foil tarnish removal step is a good one, but follow it up with traditional silver polish.
     

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