Backing out of a gig

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by acmilan629, Apr 1, 2014.

  1. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi acmilan,
    You stated:
    "For Easter I was offered a gig (in February) that paid $125 and I had said yes to it but today (April 1) was offered another from an old teacher that pays significantly more. What is the most tactful way of backing out of the former?
    ----
    There is an offer, and acceptance. You are under contract. here's what I do when a business or organization backs out or double books and tries to back out of the contract. generally, I'm easy to work with and let's face it, people make mistakes, even organizations and businesses. However, if the organization gets the least bit snotty or bossy, I email them and tell them I am due payment and the payment needs to be made within 30 days or the issue will be turned over to Small Claims Court.
    So, back to you. If I found out you blew off our agreement for a bigger, better, deal, I'd be sure that you were made to compensate me for breach of contract. Interestingly, I recieved a check Friday for just such a situation. A company entered into a contract with me and then, broke the contract because they could get someone cheaper. It ended up that they had to pay the other band AND me.
    Dr.Mark
     
  2. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

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    Unless you can find a sub then you play the gig.

    When your old teacher asked you about the gig why didn't you say "Sorry, I'm already booked"?
     
  3. mgcoleman

    mgcoleman Mezzo Forte User

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    Reputation, reputation, reputation. By the way, you most certainly can say no. If your old teacher doesn't get why that's the right answer, be glad he/she is your OLD teacher.
     
  4. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    I'm in the process of backing out of a gig that I never agreed to...

    A somewhat sticky situation, but I have a prior commitment on the same date and all I did was listen to the description of the second event. I said the date sounded familiar, so I would check my calendar and get back to them, which I did a few days later. Told them I couldn't do it, had a prior commitment, etc., but they don't want to take no for an answer. It's a friend and a source of some good gigs, but I never agreed to do it in the first place. :dontknow:
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Character counts. You even asking the question raises a bigger question - will you even listen to reason? I wouldn't take bets, but I NEVER call someone back that screwed me.
     
  6. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    deleted - double post
     
  7. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    Well, unfortunately (and I'm not saying this is right-it's not) if one is going to go around slamming others with court appearances every time there's a misunderstanding or miscommunication regarding what, often, is a verbal agreement, one runs the risk of just being looked upon as hard to work with; not worth the trouble. And we know the consequences of that.
     
  8. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Interesting... so you're in Ireland?
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Pretty much of a consensus. Tell them you are booked but next Easter is open if they want to book you now. Offer to give them a list of trumpeters you know and their phone numbers.
     
    gmonady likes this.
  10. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Apr 5, 2011
    Hi kehaulani,
    You stated:
    "Well, unfortunately (and I'm not saying this is right-it's not) if one is going to go around slamming others with court appearances every time there's a misunderstanding or miscommunication regarding what, often, is a verbal agreement, one runs the risk of just being looked upon as hard to work with; not worth the trouble. And we know the consequences of that.
    -----
    First, I never do a verbal agreement so that takes care of a lot of misunderstanding right from the get go..
    Yes, if there's a misunderstanding or miscommunication, then I'm flexible(for example, perform on a mutually agreed upon alternate day). But I've had enough people to not take the agreement seriously that I needed a mechanism for protection. In those cases where the agreement isn't taken seriously, yes, I'm real hard to deal with. My time and expertise are no less than any other worker and when people try to screw me out of what is mine I have ways to deal with it (A contract and Small Claims Court). Anyone that performs regularly without a written contract (email agreement is a contract if worded correctly) is asking to be taken advantage of. As for me, I perform alot, I play encores, I get call backs, shake hands, sign autographs after the performances, and talk to people for as long as they wish to talk to me (which is sometimes longer than I want but that's okay). Yep, people like me eventhough I blow through plumbing and possess hair far too long for my gender!!
    However, I can be hard to deal with when someone is KEY PHRASE "trying to pooch me out of what is mine."On the other side, I've actually missed performances. Yes, I've simply forgot!! How do I handle that?
    I offer to do a performance for free as a way of apologizing and as a way to make things right with the customer. The side benefit is that I don't forget very often.
    Hope this helps clear things up. I wasn't clear initially, sorry.
    Dr.Mark
     

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