Bad Buzz from decent player

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by MahlerBrass, Nov 24, 2004.

  1. MahlerBrass

    MahlerBrass Piano User

    366
    0
    Oct 1, 2004
    Houston, TX
    Thanks a lot Mr. Laureano, and just to clarify on my part, I don't mean to have a condescending tone about anything, the reason I asked is because I'm guilty of exactly what you just stated, playing exercises in a sterile fashion, and I too was guilty of doing what your colleague did, so now I'm more clear in how to be more efficient in my own practice, thanks a lot!
     
  2. dbacon

    dbacon Mezzo Piano User

    576
    7
    Oct 24, 2003
    Scottsdale, AZ.
    Manny, do you ever use the lead pipe buzzing that Bill Adam uses to get the first sounds going of the day? Listening for freedom and motion in the sound and going for no tension in the sound? Just a few long tones with the pipe to start the sound moving.

    Thanks for your contributions to this forum! :D
     
  3. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    MB,

    Happy to help... and by the way, there was not a whit of condescension to your question or tone, not at all.

    ML
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    "Manny, do you ever use the lead pipe buzzing that Bill Adam uses to get the first sounds going of the day?"

    DB,

    No, I've never done that... it's never occured to me. Also, I'm really not familiar with Adam's teaching method. I've heard about it but can't say I'm knowledgeable.

    ML
     
  5. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

    801
    1
    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    I have tried the leadpipe method somewhat, and it does work a little. I imagine that if I actually studied with Mr. Adam it would really show more of an improvement.

    Thanks, Manny. Wow, this is like an online masterclass in itself.
     
  6. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

    Age:
    31
    1,329
    1
    Jun 17, 2004
    Lebanon, TN
    Manny,

    I teach a few students as a kind of side job. Real rewarding, they're improving, I'm noticing improvement in my playing, AND I'm getting paid! :D

    Anyway, I'm big on getting them to do mouthpiece work. After long tones, I usually have them remove their mouthpiece, and match pitches with notes I play. I go from pedals, and in no real order, reach the high C, or until they can no long hit that certain higher pitch. I vary dynamics, and I am about to vary how the note is hit (Ta, or Da, or Dut or air attack). I also have them hold the mouthpiece at the very end, towards the backbore in between their thumb and index, so they don't use pressure. Sometimes, if they are having range issues that day, I have them do slurs, sometimes with mouthpiece, sometimes in horn. I also work a little balanced embochure, have them hit the highest note they can hit without setting, and have them slur to a low C, sluring back to that higher note in one breath. When they have a piece to work on, I have them mouthpiece buzz the harder parts, then they put the mouthpiece in the reciever and slur the whole problem spot, then staccato tongue the whole phrase, then play it as written. I also am big on sight reading.

    As I've said earlier, I have noticed improvement in their playing, and so has their directors. However, I want to make sure I am not missing something or I might be teaching something wrong. My previous trumpet instructors helped me very little during high school (i.e. They didn't do anything that I'm doing with my students now), and I most definitely don't want to be remembered as something that held a player back. Manny, could you give me some advice on how to better instruct my students?

    Van
     
  7. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

    Age:
    31
    1,329
    1
    Jun 17, 2004
    Lebanon, TN
    BTW, I would also love to hear everyone else's opinion as well.

    Van
     
  8. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    "When they have a piece to work on, I have them mouthpiece buzz the harder parts, then they put the mouthpiece in the reciever and slur the whole problem spot, then staccato tongue the whole phrase, then play it as written. I also am big on sight reading."

    Heavens,

    Of everything you wrote, the little bit I quoted is what I can relate to best. I simply don't have any experience with the "balanced embouchure" approach that I've seen reference to in your note and other places. Nor do I have my studio engage in similar physical approaches as a philosopical method. I have students do whatever is necessary to play well and I vary my approach to suit their strengths and weaknesses.

    All that having been said, the proof is in the pudding. You're having good results by your estimation and that means more to your students than what I have to say on a theoretical basis. I tend to use the mouthpiece on a limited basis except when I feel that a student is too often searching for notes and not hearing them ahead of time. I also have the same ones do a lot of singing.

    It sounds to me that you are having good success with your pupils. I am happiest to hear by your tone that you love teaching and that is infectious. Bravo!

    ML
     
  9. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

    Age:
    31
    1,329
    1
    Jun 17, 2004
    Lebanon, TN
    Manny,

    About "Balanced Embochure"

    Its setting on the highest note you can control, slurring down to a low C, and slurring up to that high note in a breath. I used it this summer in an attempt to improve my range to a ledger-line F. I didn't really notice a huge change in range, but I did notice a huge difference in controlling my upper register!

    The method as I teach is a bit watered down, starting on the high G. Many big supporters of the method set on the octave-above G. However, I feel that the way I teach really helps them get better control of that high G, and I think that all serious high school trumpeters should at the very least have control over the high G.

    I find that using this method, combined with long tones and some slurs, really help them with control and trickier slotting. I don't use mouthpiece buzzing a whole lot, but since some of my students are doing work out of Bitsch (Ugh...), they sometimes need to stop and get certain notes and phrases beat into their head, lol.

    Mr Laureano, thanks for your reply! I am planning on bringing in some Clarke studies to my lessons tomorrow mainly to vary things a bit. I feel they both serve the same real purpose, improving range and control. The main thing I think high school students are concerned about is range, though many don't get that control and range go hand-in-hand. I have a student now that as a Freshman in high school, can hit a ledger line G! He'll be AWESOME when I get him to control it!

    Yeah, I think I have been bitten by the teaching bug. :D

    Oh, and BTW, I just started hitting that elusive ledger-line F a week ago. HOO-RAY!

    Van
     
  10. pops

    pops Pianissimo User

    70
    8
    Mar 17, 2004
    Dallas
    Nice thread.

    Great to see Mr. Laureano posting here.

    Belated welcome. :D


    This is a topic I like.

    I don't ever make a student buzz just to buzz or just to learn to buzz.

    But:

    If they have an intonation problem; then I have them buzz to make sure they are producing the pitches instead of hoping that the horn will scoop into them.


    If the problem is projection I have them work on pitch center.

    If the problem is tone then they work on relaxing the face and getting a full buzz.

    If they have problems doing clean intervals (like the arpeggio sections of the Artunian, Hummel....) then we mouthpiece buzz to hit them all in the center.


    I always felt that if we could buzz the pitch cleanly in pitch center then we would play it there.


    Nice thread and as always (at least on THIS board) civil and well mannered.

    I hope everyone had a GREAT Thanksgiving.
     

Share This Page