Bad Days

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Bear, May 2, 2005.

  1. B15M

    B15M Forte User

    2,459
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    Dec 30, 2003
    Monroe Ct.
    When I was a full time trumpet player I don't remember having bad days.

    When I got a different job and couldn't practice as much the bad day thing started.

    Now when I have a bad day I just play what I can. I try not to push. The next day I'm fine.
     
  2. trmptr

    trmptr Pianissimo User

    101
    1
    May 10, 2005
    Bemidji, MN
    I seem to remember in a lesson with Tony Plog that he said he rarely has GOOD days. (This was in response to me complaining about my chops.) He told me you have to learn to play with consistency, so that you don't have bad days - or even particularly good days. You should get to the point where your "bad" days are still good enough to sound great, and your "good" days aren't noticeably better than your "bad" days. Consistency is the key.

    Del Lyren
     
  3. dbacon

    dbacon Mezzo Piano User

    576
    7
    Oct 24, 2003
    Scottsdale, AZ.
    Excellent point, and thanks for sharing that idea. I remember asking Tony after one of those killer Summit Brass gigs how his chops were holding up, and he said "I was just making it through that last piece." He was playing first and I thought he sounded incredible!! A great player sounds great no matter how they might feel, and no one on the outside really knows if they are right on the edge or not.
     
  4. djm6701

    djm6701 Pianissimo User

    For me, I'm going to agree with Dave Bacon's first post in the thread, regarding focus. If I am having a bad day, it is invariably because I cannot concentrate very well at that moment and cannot clearly focus on the sound of what I am trying to produce. I don't seem to have bad days caused by anything else. YMMV.
     
  5. timcates

    timcates Pianissimo User

    94
    0
    Jan 17, 2004
    Texas - USA
    the older I get, the more I've come to appreciate Bernie Glow's statement that he felt fortunate if he had three days in a month when his chops felt good - TC
     
  6. trmptr

    trmptr Pianissimo User

    101
    1
    May 10, 2005
    Bemidji, MN
    And I think that holds true for anybody. Good chop days are few and far between. Work to make the bad chop days sound good - even though it doesn't feel good.
     
  7. dbacon

    dbacon Mezzo Piano User

    576
    7
    Oct 24, 2003
    Scottsdale, AZ.
    I remember Mr. Jacobs saying his chops hadn't felt good in months.

    He sounded like the worlds greatest brass player.

    He practiced like one as well. I got to the studio early once, he was down at that Greek restaurant so I went up. His tape deck was on, so of course I re-wound his practice session. Schlossberg 97 and 98 in several keys, just fast, clear, flawless.....one cuss word or two at one point...octave leaps perfectly in tune, light as could be...one breath....time to practice!!
     
  8. trmptr

    trmptr Pianissimo User

    101
    1
    May 10, 2005
    Bemidji, MN
    And didn't Jacobs only have one lung?
     
  9. djm6701

    djm6701 Pianissimo User

    If I recall correctly, Mr. Jacobs had full use of one lung and partial use of the other. I think the one lung story is a myth. The end result was still that he had reduced capacity, therefore needing to breath more frequently ('a shorter bow').

    Back on topic, I think Ghitalla once said if he only played when his chops felt good, he would have only played once every two weeks.
     
  10. talcito

    talcito Piano User

    393
    8
    Feb 18, 2004
    Is a bad day a day your chops do not feel good or is it a day that you are just not "sounding" good.

    I find that with professional players the quality of their playing will usually be consistant no matter how they "feel".

    I think Armando Ghittala once said "Do not worry about how you feel, worry about how you sound".

    Personally, I tend to have more problems with the "feel" part of the "bad day" problem.

    My teacher, Mitch Jellen, always recommends to start the day playing at a comfortable volume, mainly with flow studies, using a cup mute.

    By using a cup mute it will give you a chance to get you chops going without worrying about the sound. When we start warming up without the mute we start trying to manipulate the sound with our chops and before you know it ---A real "bad Day" begins.

    Try using a cup mute at the start of your practise session and you will have alot more good days!

    Good Luck,

    Oscar Onoz
     

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