Band in College

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Genesis3003, Mar 1, 2009.

  1. Genesis3003

    Genesis3003 Pianissimo User

    65
    1
    Nov 3, 2008
    North Dakota
    Hi, I have been thinking about college a lot lately (I am a junior) and I have narrowed down the major to chemistry or music. I enjoy both of them and would probably also like to play varsity or intramural tennis. I have a 4.0 GPA and could probably get into any college I really want to get into (I want to stay in the midwest). I have made All-State all 3 years of high school, and am lead in a band that has played pro tunes and won multiple festivals. I have been told I have awesome tone, and can play a solid double high F. I was just wondering how much work it was for you guys to major in any music field and how much time it took up. I am really looking at St. Olaf or Luther among others, and if I go music hardcore maybe somewhere like Vandercook. Would I be able to double up with chemistry and music? or music and tennis?:dontknow:Any help greatly appreciated.
     
  2. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

    1,827
    43
    Mar 25, 2005
    Indianapolis, In
    I would say that music and tennis would not necessarily be a big problem. Just understand that a Music Major is very involved and takes a great amount of time to really become outstanding. Lots of personal practice, many rehearsals that you may or may not get credit for but are required, plus the study of music theory, music history, and the study of many musical styles are all included in the formal study of music. If you are leaning toward an area major then even more time is involved.
     
  3. oohhh yeah

    oohhh yeah Pianissimo User

    244
    2
    Nov 23, 2008
    B.C. Canada
    You won't get enough $$$$ from a music career, so you should study both.
     
  4. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

    1,869
    210
    Oct 16, 2008
    Kudos to you for doing so well in school. Having multiple options like this is frustrating, but but it's much better than having no options at all.

    At this point try to think about what you want to do for a living. Tough task indeed, but try to picture what kind of living you want to make ($$$) and what kind of schedule you'd like to work. If you want to make a lot of money then chemistry is the way to go, but you won't have much free time during the week (even less if you have a family) so you'll have to wait for the weekend to play.

    If you go with music the money won't be as great, but you'll have more time to play and probably a bit more flexibility with your schedule. Maybe a compromise would be the field of education. You could teach chemistry in a high school or university and still be involved with music.

    Good luck.
     
  5. Genesis3003

    Genesis3003 Pianissimo User

    65
    1
    Nov 3, 2008
    North Dakota
    Thanks for all the tips everyone. I hope I didn't come off arrogant with the first message. I wanted to leave some background info but I had to do so in a hurry.
     
  6. samdaman

    samdaman Pianissimo User

    129
    2
    Jun 15, 2006
    Baltimore, MD
    Becoming a music major is definitely not like every other major out there. When friends with other majors are out at the movies or partying, you'll be in the practice room or playing in a concert (I know from experience). Along with music classes (Aural Skills, Music Theory, History courses, Conducting, Repertoire Analysis, Lessons, Education Classes {If you choose that route}, studio classes, etc. just to name a few.), you will also have General Education classes if you go to a University. I know that my course load right now is 21 credits. Most of my friends as music majors are between 18-26 credits. A 'normal' major only has to take 12-16 credits each semester. I can only speak for Penn State (I'm sure it's true at other Universities though) that they also water down credit hours as well. For an ensemble that meets 4 hours a week, we only get 1 credit, as opposed to the 4 credits it should be worth (usually it's about 1hour of class per semester= 1 credit).

    As much work as it is, I couldn't live without it. It's not a question of what you want to do for a living, but rather what would make you get up every morning going "I can't wait for Dentistry/Performing/Music Teaching today!!!" Turn each on of those statements around in your mind and see which one you can spend a CAREER, not just 4 years, doing. I personally love music and I love teaching. I could not see myself doing anything else. The thought of teaching elementary school students about their first notes on an instrument, or this is what classical music sounds like, or taking a high school band through Holst's First Suite in Eb is something that... in a way... completes me???. I'm not sure how to explain it. It's a passion, not a job. If anything turns into a job, then maybe you should rethink what you're doing. (Coming down the ideological soap box) I can't answer these questions for you, but BE HONEST WITH YOURSELF!!!!!! Let me repeat this---> BE HONEST WITH YOURSELF!!!! It doesn't help to say "I'm going to be a music major!!!" if you get bored listening to anything then 94.1FM. At the same time though, don't say "I am going to be a Chemistry major!!!" if you're life would feel weird with out performing or teaching. Maybe start off a semester as a double major, and see where you feel, or don't feel, pulled too. You can always make those extra classes count somewhere!!!!

    Hope this provoked some though. If you have any thing you want to ask, my email is on my profile.

    Oh! and I almost forgot... You won't be majoring in 'Band.' It's majoring in 'MUSIC' for a reason.
     
  7. stradman22

    stradman22 New Friend

    7
    0
    Dec 8, 2008
    bottom line.... music majors: love practicing, know that they want to be a musician even if it means being poor.

    if you want to make a decent living at the end of the day being a chem major is your best bet. Also, varsity tennis+music major at any respectable school is going to be near impossible, just because of the time commitment needed for both.

    Was in a very similar situation with you, decided to go the engineering route, yet still be in my university's band, just not commit the time into being a music major.

    If i were you I would go to the best school you can for chemistry, join some ensembles, and play intramural tennis.
     

Share This Page