bbreathing and blowing question

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by beppe, Apr 24, 2006.

  1. beppe

    beppe New Friend

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    Feb 9, 2006
    Some teachers say to take always a full breath before playing, others say to take only the breath necessary to play the following passage. :?:

    Some teachers say to "blow blow blow" at all volumes, others say that the most important thing is to "not overblow". :?:

    What do you think about these topics???
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Air is like salt: you need the right amount.
     
  3. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    I always fill up when I get ready to play no matter the length of the phrase. Now, for those of you rolling your eyes, let me explain. When I fill up there is not the usual tightness that many folks believe has to go along with taking a lot of air. I think that's because I believe in the quick release of that air. In other words, unlike a lot of players I don't hold the air and over-compress intra-orally before I release the sound. As I've stated many times on various fora, the end of the breath is the beginning of the note. Air is free and there's no cost to taking plenty, so, I always take a full breath.

    Since I'm not 21 years old anymore, the full breath is pretty important to me. The longer I am in this business the more important it is that I keep the gas tank full just to go the same distance.

    ML
     
  4. beppe

    beppe New Friend

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    I've found a text that can be interesting:

    "Basically I believe it's important to always inhale to the maximum. I know there are a lot of players who suggest to only take in the amount needed, but I maintain that you have the same amount of tubing in which to make the air vibrate at the appropriate speed in order to produce whatever note but also to have the potential for having the maximum resonance, dynamic control, range of color (timbre), as well as phrasing and nuance. It is also necessary to provide the body (and brain) with the oxygen necessary to function efficiently. It's been my experience both personally and with students, that all playing deficiencies can be attributed to insufficient air. I could go on in more detail but I hope this gives an overview."
    Charles Schlueter
     
  5. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    So, you need more salt!
     
  6. the8thchef

    the8thchef New Friend

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    the key to breathing is the exhalation. we breathe in what plants breathe out, and we breathe out what plants breathe in. we inhale all of our surroundings, and we exhale to those surroundings our internal energy or lifeforce. although we inhaled first when we came to the world, it was the reciprocal exhalation that announced to the world our presence. the exhalation is a natural reconnection of our energy with the energy of everything else; the exhalation is an updated connection from the self to the all.

    this is why the spoken word, music, and creative sound are all so powerful. it is the releasing of vital energy, lifeforce, in concerted and determined ways; made even more powerful when the releasing is disciplined.

    practice deep breathing throughout the day. try to breathe slowly and deeply throughout all of your actions in the day. when you inhale, take notice of the energy/oxygen spreading through your blood and body. when you exhale, exhale with gentle focus beginning from the center of your being/body.

    practice deep breathing daily. when you play the trumpet, where your inhalation/exhalation is most focused and determined and disciplined, you should be able to notice greater breath control, endurance, and your tone should be wherever it is supposed to be.

    talking about filling up the tank, and whatnot....practicing slow, deep breathing increases you 'mileage per gallon'. in doing this, you train your body to function normally or better on relatively less air, as your in/exhales are at a slower rate while your actions and body functions are done at 'normal' rates. you achieve equal or greater production using less energy.

    so, its not more salt, but the way in which your body uses the salt.
     
  7. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Your points are well-taken, 8th, that breathing is a natural process that shouldn't be diminished or ignored relative to its importance in everthing we do.

    Consider, though, that when we exhale for the most part we do so without restriction under normal circumstances. The moment we put that piece of metal up to our lips, the potential for impeding that lovely, natural exhalation has just increased. Our biggest challenge is to maintain the natural exhale with a minimum of blockage as we try to blow through all that resistant tubing. So, if we can adopt that intake and release in a natural way, as you described, all the while minimizing that impedance at the lips, we have the freedom to let the lips vibrate freely and make music with that exhalation.

    There's something about introducing said piece of metal that flummoxes some folks and remembering to exhale without restriction is a worthy aim. To remember that playing trumpet is like singing is a tool towards that aim.

    Thanks for your contribution, 8th.

    ML
     
  8. MahlerBrass

    MahlerBrass Piano User

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