Beethoven's 5th

Discussion in 'Orchestra / Solo / Chamber Music' started by timothypierson, Jan 17, 2006.

  1. timothypierson

    timothypierson Pianissimo User

    57
    1
    Feb 20, 2005
    Hi Manny,

    We're doing Beethoven's Fifth Symphony in Orchestra. Have you ever heard of it?

    Just kidding, actually there are a couple of parts where I double a high F with the other trumpet (I'm playing 2nd), and have been missing the note or getting a no show. It's not that it's too high but I'm afraid of the notes being too loud. We are playing this in a small orchestra. I know that the problem is mental and just wanted your thoughts on how to approach this. I guess this question applies to most symphonies of this area. Any info would be great.

    Thank You
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    I think young players have an incorrect view of Beethoven. I believe that they put him in the Mozart/Haydn type of light playing that makes them back off.

    This is not so with Beethoven symphonies. You may know that I'm in our musician's lounge in between sessions recording the 8th and 9th. You would likely be shocked at how loudly we have to play sometimes. However, your situation is different because, as you say, it's a smaller orchestra. Try a little deeper mouthpiece than you normally play if you can get one. The idea is that you want a warm yet powerful sound for Beethoven and a deeper mouthpiece may help that. If not, just play normally and the conductor will let you know how much to blow. Use it as a learning experience and you'll find your sound level.

    ML
     
  3. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

    2,342
    6
    Aug 11, 2005
    Atlanta, GA
     
  4. Rimshot

    Rimshot Pianissimo User

    93
    0
    Feb 14, 2005
    Atlanta
    By all means, check out some of the "dainty" :-o Beethoven brass work from Harry Glantz for Toscanini, or Louis Davidson/Bennie Adlestein for Szell, Vienna Phil w/Kleiber, even Mr. Smoothie, Karajan and his Berlin steamroller. Maybe this is at least one reason or at least a hint why I've found so many recent (last 3 decades!) Beethoven recordiing/performances rather bland and "uncommitted" sounding.

    Oh, if cowardly conductors only had a heart (you know the trumpeters will be glad to oblige...) Is you guys gonna provide some relief, Manny? :-)
     
  5. cornetguy

    cornetguy Mezzo Forte User

    797
    4
    Sep 12, 2005
    Saint Paul, MN
     
  6. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Funny you ask should since Bob and I talked about that before we started recording. The fact is, conductors never say a word about it because they don't really know about intimate things like that, that second players do because it sounds so natural to the ear When you consider what conductors are listening for and dealing with, it just doesn't occur to them.

    I asked Bob to please play the parts where they are written because I don't think it has that revolutionary sound when it's so comforting to the ear. So, we're doing less of the displaced octave thing at my request, not the conductor's. It's more difficult but that's why second trumpet is such an important job.

    ML
     
  7. timothypierson

    timothypierson Pianissimo User

    57
    1
    Feb 20, 2005
    Manny I took your advice and just went for it, and played with a little meatier sound. It helped a lot, I didn't scratch the F's and the conductor seemed happy. He wanted us to play quieter in spots but it was for the ensemble as a whole and not just the trumpets. As I've been playing more Beethoven (we did the 4th last term), I have gained a greater appreciation of him, and can definitely hear his influence on composers like Mahler and Shostakovich.
     

Share This Page