Beginner Issue (I don't even know what to call it)

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Persinji, Aug 30, 2014.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Jackson NC
    While the embouchure and aperture are very important, without adequate lip vibration the true sound of a trumpet is absent.

    That stated, in ascertaining your valves are inserted into the casings properly, other than the numbering, you should note a valve guide on each that aligns with a groove in the casing.

    Your director depressed the first valve and you should have heard (with Bb music) an F then Bb, and lastly an F again all within the treble clef. In concert key, as you read these on a chromatic tuner they would be Eb, Ab, and Eb again or a whole step down as would be played on a piano, violin, or other C pitched instrument (and what you're actually hearing).

    Tell us what brand and model trumpet you have! If you don't know the model, provide only the first 3 numerical numbers and any alpha prefix of the serial ID found on the second valve or on some Bessons on the underside of the bell near the valve block.
     
  2. Persinji

    Persinji New Friend

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    Aug 29, 2014
    I have a Brundy Selmer (884475 ML). I took it to the music store a few minutes ago to check if there was any problem with the trumpet. He didn't play on it, but did check the valves, water keys, and some other things and came to the conclusion that nothing was really wrong with my instrument.

    Which means that it's most likely my embrouchure or lip or something, that's making all this happen. I'm using a Bach 7C by the way. It's also the same one my band instructor used to make his notes when testing the instrument.
     
  3. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    There is little anyone can do without seeing and hearing what is going on, I can think of several traps a beginner could fall into especially if they are not having proper tuition. Personally I don't really like to comment without more to go on, (a video for example)
     
  4. Persinji

    Persinji New Friend

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    Aug 29, 2014
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    As Andy stated, we've gone about as far as we can without face and sound check and I believe you've also now concluded whatever is presently wrong is coming from YOU. In my opinion (IMO) Bundy-Selmer trumpets are OK for a beginner and often used as "beaters" in marching bands here in US where the propensity of getting dings and dents is greater. While other size mouthpieces may be more comfortable, IMO there is nothing you can't do with a 7C.
     
  6. Persinji

    Persinji New Friend

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    Aug 29, 2014
    Yeah, everything seems to be fine with the trumpet. I'll try to find a teacher nearby or talk to my band director who used to play trumpet to see what's going on with what I'm doing. Thanks for all of the help!
     
  7. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    GET A TEACHER. NOW.

    (and burn the clarinet as soon as you need some heat in the stove... :evil:)
     
  8. larry tscharner

    larry tscharner Forte User

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    I dont see any alternative....you need professional help. It should cost nothing to take a trumpet into your local shop and have some one play it and rule out the instrument. If you dont have access to a shop locally, try your band mates, is there someone you can swap horns with (keeping the same mouthpiece)? If you sound crappy on another horn and he/she sounds ok on yours, then its you! Your instructor if they truely are an instructor in brass should see a problem in your technique and take steps from there. Good luck. Best wishes.
     
  9. Persinji

    Persinji New Friend

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    Aug 29, 2014
    Thank you all for the fast responses!! I think I've more or less ruled out the possibility that it's the instrument. It's just me (though I did initially have an issue with the valves facing the wrong way). I'll start searching for a brass instructor asap. I know there are some in the area for sure, so I won't have difficulties there. Again, thank you!!
     
  10. mellophone

    mellophone New Friend

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    Aug 22, 2014
    Ohio, USA
    My recommendation is just to check the valves again. Once their in, twist them until they click. Every horn I've played, the valves would click into place. Once that is done, try playing again. If the water key is working fine, then maybe check the mouthpiece? Check the end of it for any dents, (not the cup part)If there is a major dent in the end of a mouthpiece, that can cause air leakage. (Once had a student drop his mouthpiece and it had a bad enough dent to ruin his playing) Another thing I recommend doing, is taking a flash light and shine it into the bell. Then remove all of the slides and valves and shining the light into those. There's a possibility for something to be stuck in it that's muffling the playing. I had a bugle that had the backing of an MP3 lodged into it. I couldn't remove it. I believe that horn was sent back to its Air Force base... If there's nothing stuck, put everything back together. I suggest maybe even bathing it. It may clean out anything that could possibly be causing this. Could you maybe post pictures of the horn? Maybe someone who has the same one can offer the best advice.

    Well, if you try all of these, remember that the valves should click into place when you already have them in (backwards or not) when you twist them. Check to see if something is stuck inside it, or if the mouthpiece has a dent that's causing the leak.

    My mellophone has a similar problem. In its lead pipe, there is a hole, so it has to be covered up with tape for it to work, or else it sounds soft and un-mellophone like. It sadly obtained all of its injuries from previous owners. I was struggling with note problems with my cornet. I didn't understand why, and then the valves started to slow down, and my slides weren't working anymore, even when I greased and oiled everything. After 32 years, I gave it its first bath, and now I do not struggle with the problems. So, if you bathe it, make sure to snake out the slides. If blueish green water comes out when you rinse the slides, make sure to snake it and rinse multiple times. This shouldn't be a problem if you have a new horn.
     

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