Beginners breath discovery

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Blind Bruce, Aug 3, 2009.

  1. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    Holy cow Man... Unless you tell me that you are a collector I'll say your problem is that you are using way too much equipment! HAHA.

    The properties and acoustics of sound will produce some of the "back pressure" or resistance that you feel. It is ok. If there were no resistance, we would not be able to play for longer than it takes us to exhale without the horn. The "trick" is in learning how to control your breath in a manner that doesn't cause you discomfort and also is highly efficient... which leads us back to the yoga, swimming, etc. Try it for a few weeks, see what happens.
     
  2. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    Well, I probably do have too much hardware. Sometimes the solution is right where you start. In this case, maybe it is, and I just wandered around too much. After reading the posts again, I just grabbed my beat up Olds Ambassador cornet with an Olds 3 mouthpiece (my starting horn 55 years ago), sat in a comfortable chair (rather than standing as usual), relaxed and just started playing some music without trying to outdo myself. I played softly for the most part, and very relaxed. Sometimes I closed my eyes and just focused on the sound. I played for an hour or more and did not feel lightheaded and did not feel out of breath, and did not feel backpressure in my head. I did not run out of steam and I could still hit C, D, E above the staff at the end. Now, I don't know that the trumpet/mouthpiece combination was totally responsible but something was different about that session and I felt better at the end than I remember feeling before. I could have kept on going if I didn't have to do other things. Tomorrow I will take another "hardware" combination and try the same thing. If that works, too, then I will know that I just need to focus on the relaxing part, not the hardware. But, then the question comes up, how to transfer that sensation to the 'real world' of playing where not everything is soft and relaxed sitting in an easy chair. But, I can work on that part later.
     
  3. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Well as ROWUK continues to tell us - 90% of trumpet playing is in your head - perhaps you could take yourself to your special (relaxed) place when you play. The mind is a very powerful beastie. It can make us sick, but it can also make us well.
     
  4. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    Comebackkid,
    Maybe when you are "in the real world" playing, you are having some problems hearing yourself, thus playing louder, thus not comfortable, thus start having probs, etc... Ever tried playing with one ear plug in your ear? Again, just thoughts that come up while I read posts. Take care.
     
  5. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    May 11, 2009
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    That's a good point. It may be that is what I am doing. I will try the earplug. What happens if I try a plug in BOTH ears? (That is what my wife does.)
    Thanks.
     
  6. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    Apr 30, 2004
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    You can do both ears if you want. Experiment. Sometimes people find that both ears cause too much of a sound loss and tuning/etc suffers within the ensemble. That's your choice. But you can at least try to plug one ear and see if that helps with the supposed probs you are experiencing. My two cents! Hope I can help. Peace.
     
    tedh1951 likes this.

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