Best Cool-down exercise?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by garlory84, May 31, 2011.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Good point! Having the ice floating in a gin and tonic bath and placing the lips into this bath mixture will provide antiseptic action; however, should you "accidently" sip this bath mixture, I cannot be held responsible for the clinical consequences that may follow.
     
  2. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Hey, if that's what the doctor orders... :roll:!
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    YES and here it is:

    Rx: Gin (Bombay Sapphire - DAW) and Tonic - Total volume (4 oz); add 4 cubes di-hydrogen oxide

    Sig: i-ii PO qd PRN for strained lips

    Place top lip into solution bath until moistened. Sipping is recommended to strerilize the tongue and back of the throat to assure lips do not become contaminated. Pick up cubes and rub against lower lip, then drop back into container and swirl. Sip once again, and repeat process.

    Ref: 4 (Remember to use responsibly)

    You should be able to get this filled at any bar or pub of your choice. Go ahead, try to file it under your health insurance medication plan. And see if we can get our proprietors to join with the major pharmacy's to become part of the $4 prescription plan!
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2011
  4. garlory84

    garlory84 New Friend

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    wow you guys are so funny
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Last edited: Jun 1, 2011
  6. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    I'll second what was said about ice.

    The outer part of the lip, which vibrates and often swells is soft tissue, not muscle.
    Soft tissue can be "healed" with ice and NSAID medicines like Ibuprofen.

    I was told this by a world class physician who also plays trumpet.

    Can we finally put this "warm down / cool down / post playing" topic and myth about
    lips and lactic acid to rest? The people who support it sound really ignorant to the rest of us who have actually consulted MD's who understand physiology.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Good point, and I really think we can put this to rest.

    Bottom Line: There is no physiological reason to warm down post playing.
    However if experiencing signs of stress after playing, use of ice topically to the lips can minimize the damage resulting from strain. All this from a well respected evidence-based physician that also happens to play the trumpet and consults with himself on a regular basis.
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Found this on the internet (so it's gotta be true!).

    Soft tissue - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    With my better half being an attorney, I've heard the term "soft tissue" often. It's a term that rolls off the whiplash attorneys tongue effortlessly. Muscle is soft tissue. A crude rule of thumb is this. If you can cut it with a knife it's soft. If you need a saw it's not. Calling people ignorant because of a difference of opinion is well.. you know. No one that disagrees with the "cool down/warm down" approach has said anything about it being harmful, only that they don't do it so it's pointless. Having lost relatives to incompetent MD's, I cringe when someone says a doctor said it so it's got to be true. Not that this is a life or death topic.
     
  9. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Well, to be clear, I'm not a doctor, I just happen to be around a lot of them!:-)

    But, the MD I referred to is real, does practice here and is a fine trumpet player in our local orchestra.

    Greg
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Another good point and as your unofficial physician moderator, I have the following commentary:

    First of all the graph from the Wikipedia reference brings home a good point related to this discussion (I am right brained and love to look at graphs over equations any day).

    [​IMG]

    Figure 1: Graph of lagrangian stress (T) versus stretch ratio (λ) of a preconditioned soft tissue.

    See the function is related to PRE-conditioning of soft tissue. POST-conditioning offers nothing physically to the function of normal physiological stress. It’s the ABnormal physiological stress (when damage has been done) that the ice therapy to minimize the "healing" inflammatory response can be minimized. We know this very well from therapies that work on athletes after a strain injury.

    Now with this said: Be careful of information from the internet. I require that ALL my first year medical students are not allowed to use internet searches for their answers to my Team-based Learning teaching sessions, as through the years, when they rely on this information about 70% of their answers are WRONG. Either because the information is wrong OR even more the situation, these young student physicians mis-interpret the information they receive.

    Now Here is the real scary thing that may tick off physicians reading this site. A high validity study was done on how often physicians make the optimal medical decision on medical situations that requires more high level integration of information. Here are the results from: Advances in Health Sciences Education. 1997;1:221-226.

    Specialty Mean Score in % Time Optimal Decision is Made
    Internal Medicine 57.4%
    Family Practice 50.1%
    Surgery 45.2%
    Other 44.8%
    Overall Average 47%

    Pediatricians were included under other, and while one side of me is an internist, the other is a pediatrician. So I asked one of the author's why pediatricians were not reported. The reply was they were affraid to report that number as their decisions were only optimal 38% of the time. Medical students at this institution when used as controls, made the right medical decision 41% of the time. What is scary is that after 4 years of medical school and 3-7 years of residency, optimal decision making is made only by 6% difference over medical students.

    So do be careful when you state that a physician made the comment, so it must be right. While it may be "right" it may not be optimal. We should expect nothing but the absolute optimal from our health care professionals.

    Here is a sobering comparison, if airline pilots only got it "right" 99.9% of the time, there would be 480 airline related deaths per day!
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2011
    tobylou8 likes this.

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