Best exercise ever??!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by NYCO10, Dec 10, 2010.

  1. NYCO10

    NYCO10 Pianissimo User

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    Hi guys, recently i have been doing 'whisper tones', playing at the quietist dynamic possible, right on the edge to where the sound 'fizzes' out'. These for my have been a life changing exercise; tone, breath control, range, articulation have all improved dramatically! how can one simple exercise be so good??

    NYCO10:play:
     
  2. The Kraken

    The Kraken Piano User

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    Someone will chim in with more detail I'm sure, but my understanding of these exercises is that it forces you to use more control, thus you improve. If I'm wrong someone will educate us!! :D
     
  3. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

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    Keep in mind that there's no "magic pill" with trumpet playing. These instant gains will probably fade in a little while.

    Slow and steady...
     
  4. NYCO10

    NYCO10 Pianissimo User

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    I do not believe in a 'magic pill' but i do believe in 'magic technique', i believe that this exercise focuses the aperture and enhances efficiency!
    :thumbsup:
     
  5. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Yes, playing very quietly is a good thing. I do whisper tones and I'll pull out the tuning slide and play softly the lead pipe.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I think that you will discover that you euphoria is shortlived. Only a balanced program will lead to success which by the way is measured in months and years.

    If your daily routine is mostly very quiet, you need more time to build chops. Another critical issue is getting enough volume so that the horn resonance becomes the goal. The horn can take a lot of work away from us if we blow very centered. Playing very softly without someone monitoring can result in a less centered tone.
     
  7. NYCO10

    NYCO10 Pianissimo User

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    This 'euphoria' that you mention has been happening to me for the past 6 months. My tone is more centred, focused, a lot richer and playing is now easier! I have also found that playing quieter in practice helps me play louder in ensemble rehearsals! :thumbsup:

    i forgot to mention, introducing the alexander technique and breathing exercises (including topping off) has been contributing aswel!
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2010
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    The best exercises in the world are those we individually need the most; there are not just one, but many best exercises. (They also tend to be the ones we don't like.)
     
  9. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    soft tones and long tones really helped me over the past year or so also -- but "opening up" to balanced louder projection with musicality --- seems to be a little different method.

    but I would continue to practice whatever helps you -- that is what is important
     
  10. jengstrom

    jengstrom Pianissimo User

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    I, too, have discovered the magic of quiet playing over the past year, specifically the fabled 20 minute G. It refocuses me like nothing else. However, I think Rowuk is right in that it takes a balanced routine to achieve our fullest potential as trumpet players.

    I think its just that for some of us, what has been missing is that quiet, focused approach. We get into routines where we play the majority of things loudly, or high, or technically complicated, etc., and miss that last piece of the puzzle. Other people may miss other things, like the high, the loud, etc., while spending a lot of time focusing the embouchure with various excercises. When we find that missing piece, it completes the puzzle and we suddenly improve, sometimes dramatically. We then forget about all the other good things we've done and say, "I just found the magic technique." All you did was add a missing variable.

    I'm as guilty of this as anyone.

    -John
     
    Vulgano Brother likes this.

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