Best Foreign Language to Learn?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ColinWhite, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    He's a Septic Tank, so he should start with English. ROFL
     
  2. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Uncharitable - but Hella Funny!
     
  3. patkins

    patkins Forte User

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    I studied German in college. Can I speak it precisely? "Nein. Konnen sie deucht sprechen?
    I also studied Spanish. " Habla espanol?" Commo esta usted?
    Of the three languages, the one I would prefer further study is German. Its roots in English is obvious.
    But, more importantly, I can read music, precisely. Playing music precisely is what I'm trying to do while practicing.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2011
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Maybe music should be credited as a foreign language in schools.
     
  5. Sol

    Sol Pianissimo User

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    I'd learn English first, since it is the first foreign language taught wherever it doesn't happen to be spoken. So fi you try to make yourself understood in a foreign language, and you aren't, then you can fall back to English, provided than you can speak English.

    As far as learning another language to further your career as a trumpet player, first get the job (language skills aren't considered), then learn the language that they speak where you were offered the job.
     
    tedh1951 likes this.
  6. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    That's a capital "S" to you. :D

    I lived and worked professionally in Germany for 20 years, have a German family and raised two kids speaking mainly German to them. I would not consider German an easy language. It's easy to start because of a commonality of English and German words, that's true, but once I got into adjectives, declensions, etc., I found it to be a mine field, personally, when compared to English. I mean, a different ending for the colour "green" depending on whether or not you are describing green tea or a green notebook? Oy! I found getting by in casual conversation around a table one thing, while watching and trying to understand complex, psychological dramas or writinging literate, yet appropriately colloquial documents, something altogether different and much more difficult.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2011
  7. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    No, they just sound more effective! This is probably not the place to provide examples. My wife reckons some perfectly polite german words sound like swear words. (z.B. "lecker")

    --bumblebee
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I can truly say, I've never heard Bavarian men complain about this.
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Duh! If the horse gets sick, somebody has to pull the plow!
     
  10. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    R O F L That's funny!
     

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