Best way to approach growling?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by YamaMan, Feb 14, 2009.

  1. YamaMan

    YamaMan Pianissimo User

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    Basically like the title says: I've been having trouble learning how to growl. I was hoping I could get some tips from some more experienced players. :play:
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    What have you tried and what doesn't work?

    I have trouble going to work sometimes. Before giving advice, it helps to know something about the route and traffic, my sleeping habits and other distractions that contribute to the issue.
     
  3. YamaMan

    YamaMan Pianissimo User

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    The way I was initially told is to make a growling sound at the back of my throat while playing, but I have been having trouble blowing and growling at the same time. (I hope that makes sense).

    I was wanting to know if there was another way to growl or if I just need to start practicing it more.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The growl (the way that I learned it) is a fluttering of the tongue while playing. Often the intensity of the "growl" changes during the note that it is played on. That can be practiced without the horn, then with the mouthpiece, then with the horn.

    What do you need it for? It helps to have a teacher or player demonstrate, or at least have a recording to get an idea what the product is before attacking this.
     
  5. YamaMan

    YamaMan Pianissimo User

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    My old trumpet teacher demonstrated for me. I am hoping to use it in a jazz band I'm in.
     
  6. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

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    I've also heard several people explain that growling should be accomplished by fluttering the tongue, but I've never been able to do it that way! I can't roll my r's either, so maybe it's a physical thing for me.

    In order for me to accomplish a grown, I actually grown in the back of my throat. It's probably not the proper way to do it, but it was the only way I could do it...
     
  7. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    I can neither roll my rs or flutter tongue. I think there is a genetic thing at play, like the way some folks can roll their tongues along the axis from tip to throat. I didn't learn to whistle until I was 13, so maybe there is hope yet for flutter tonguing - maybe someone will have a special master class for that.
    veery
     
  8. Bach219

    Bach219 Mezzo Piano User

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    Flutter tonguing and growling are to separate techniques, right? I watched a video on it, which I'll try to post if I can find it, and he said they sound ALMOST alike.
     
  9. Bach219

    Bach219 Mezzo Piano User

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    OH
  10. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Veery, rolling your tongue is genetically based - if you can't do it then neither can one or both of your parents - this is almost a visible DNA check of your natural parents, be very careful how you use it. I have a different problem, my Mum (Mom) can still at nearly 89 y.o. touch the tip of her nose with the tip of her tongue - that too, apparently is genetically based, as is the ability to control the muscles in the scalp that allow some of us to wiggle our ears - none of these things should effect the way you are able to growl down your horn - I get the effect by flutter tonguing but initiating the flutter at the back fleshy part of the tongue and having the flutter travel to the tip. - all done with airflow.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2009

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