best way to protect your horn??????

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by harveyhassanator, Sep 5, 2010.

  1. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Get it gold plated
     
  2. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Good advice from others. Sounds like you need to use a combination of methods. Get a valve guard that offers maximum protection -extra leather for leadpipe, 3rd valve slide etc. Using a cloth is also good. I bought a pack of the micrfiber cloths at Wal Mart for $5 or $6. They work well for holding horn and wiping it down afterwards. Be sure to WASH the cloths ever so often. Otherwise, you end up wiping down your horn with perspiration.

    I know as a kid, my teacher (a pro big band player) used to use clear fingernail polish on contact points where his horn was wearing. THink it worked well.

    Gold plating is another good suggestion-but expensive. I have also heard the new epoxy lacquers hold up much better than the old ones.
     
  3. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    This issue has been dealt with before.

    The best way to preserve the lacquer finish is to keep the horn clean. Anything else added, like valve guards or gloves, affects the playing. Clean your horn; wipe it down thoroughly after playing.

    Gold plating will change the way it plays.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The best way to protect the horn is to never play it. If you use anything as much as you should, it will wear after a while. Give a horn a bath once a month, keep oil and grease on the slides, wipe it down after playing and keep it in the case when you are not playing it.

    Gold is soft and wears, silver the same, lacquer is tough until it gets damaged, the stuff gets under it.

    An overhaul every 10 years or so can also keep the appearance top.
     
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    3M makes a mylar adhesive tape (years ago it was known as #850) and was available both clear and in a gold and in 4" width. So, you know where I'm going ... I hope. You cut a valve cover from such mylar and also any other spots you consistently hold. May I suggest you always allow a 1/4" fold back tab for removal.

    Others have suggested using clear postal tape, which built up with a small overlap from bottom to top of the valve section works well enough for a while ... but just isn't as durable as mylar.
     
  6. Alex_C

    Alex_C Piano User

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    There are leather gloves made for cops/motorcycle cops that are very thin, allowing a good "feel" for I dunno, shooting their guns, manipulating handcuffs, cop stuff. Something like that may be good for playing, except for the fact that you'll look odd playing with gloves. But you could wear 'em for all playing except public performance. I'd get more than one pair, and wash (saddle soap) and treat with Lexol regularly.
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Many years as a LEO, the only gloves I wore that would spec to reduce acidity were forensic latex or plastic and fit either hand. Yes, there are smart looking leather and fabric gloves in all the uniform catalogues I still receive but none tout usability in police operations. Too, I've yet to see a marksperson wear a glove on their trigger hand, OR a real officer do a pat down and cuff wearing gloves.
     
  8. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Trumpetplus is right. Gold plating will change things and wiping it down after you play is excellent advice.
    Great advice Trumpetplus
     
  9. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I'm not challenging your statement about gloves, but I don't understand/see how they could change the sound. How do they do that? Just looking for answers.
     
  10. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Thanks for the question.

    All the research we have done on trumpets and mouthpieces has been empirical, not theoretical. Whatever question there has been on anything; we have physically created the situation on several instruments to discover the answer. As far as gloves are concerned, we checked those out with many players and instruments in 2001 and found that wearing gloves changed the sound in all cases.

    For what it is worth, we found the same type of difference in comparing instruments with pearl or plastic finger buttons to the same instruments with one-piece metal finger buttons. The holding position of your left hand and the amount you squeeze the trumpet also has an effect (I showed this one to a new customer just this past Saturday).

    I could continue with every design decision that was made in the development of our trumpets; however, suffice it to say that everything you do to the instrument or the player affects the way the instrument plays.

    So, to answer your question, the way for you to understand the difference is to carefully, in a controlled room, with very perceptive listeners, do the experiment yourself.
     

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