Big School=Big Time?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Principaltrumpet, Jun 10, 2007.

  1. Principaltrumpet

    Principaltrumpet Pianissimo User

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    I am just curious, how often does someone from a small university get a top notch position? I look at the credentials of players in major symphonies and most are from the top schools and have studied with the top teachers.

    Is there any hope for me?
    JR
     
  2. tatakata

    tatakata Mezzo Forte User

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    May 29, 2007
    Do you want a brutally honest answer or the sugar coated one?

     
  3. Principaltrumpet

    Principaltrumpet Pianissimo User

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    north texas
    Honest....i can take it like a man....I think!
     
  4. jcstites

    jcstites Mezzo Forte User

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    Jun 1, 2005
    Tallahassee, FL
    The new artist in residence here, Tom Hooten went to South Florida for his undergrad I believe. Craig Morris went to Ohio State, right? There are many other people like them.

    There are lots of "big school" grads that work normal jobs now.

    There are practice rooms at every school...
     
  5. tatakata

    tatakata Mezzo Forte User

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    May 29, 2007
    Wrong. Google for his bio. The honest answer is even those who go to the "big schools" have a tough time getting the "big gigs". And if you didn't go to one of the "big schools" the deck is probably even more stacked against you.

    Is there hope? Sure there is. You asked the question and I'm giving you an honest answer.


     
  6. jcstites

    jcstites Mezzo Forte User

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    My bad, Texas.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2007
  7. MahlerBrass

    MahlerBrass Piano User

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    I believe Hooten received a Masters from Rice, that's kind of a big deal school.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Although at the end of the day it may amount to the same thing, I think WHO you study with will make a bigger impact than WHERE.

    Let's face it, the solo repertoire is covered more than adequately by every school, but many of the players taking auditions make big rhythm, articulation and tempo errors on orchestral passages. As a rule, the orchestras are not buying someone to play the Haydn concerto full time. The right WHO understands what the orchestras need and focusses on those skills. Many of the profs. teaching today are brilliant trumpet teachers with their own agenda that may or may not line up with the day to day orchestral necessities. I freelance quite a bit here in Germany and most of the people that I play with really understand the trumpet, but do not understand their function in the ensemble. They can play all the notes BEAUTIFULLY - even if that is NOT what is required. Tom Hooten talked about the color RED and BURN in a recent post. Great insight into one of the seldom taught aspects.............
    If the original post was intended to aid someone in picking a school, do some research on WHO has placed their students. I think THAT is the way to increase your chances!
     
  9. Shermock

    Shermock New Friend

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    Dec 12, 2006
    Maple Grove, MN
    I agree with Rowuk. You have to make sure you're studying with the player/professor who'll get you the farthest toward your goals.

    That being said, I also think the environment does make a difference. I tell all of my students that I want to change what they call "good." It's hard to know what that is unless you're in an environment that promotes/rewards an exceptionally high level of playing. Not every school is going to do that, IMHO.

    I would never have known what a person could accomplish on the trumpet if I hadn't been exposed to it on a daily basis, listening to my fellow trumpeters at school. People my own age were playing soooo much better than I was, and I felt really behind. It was as much motivation for practice as was studying with my prof.

    Anyway, my personal experience, my $.02.

    Shermock:-)
     
  10. uatrmpt

    uatrmpt Piano User

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    AL
    Here's a perfect example of what Rowuk is talking about: Leonard Candelaria at UAB.
     

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