Black Brass

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Lupis, May 15, 2010.

  1. hichez

    hichez Pianissimo User

    127
    0
    Jul 13, 2009
    For some reason I think it will be best if he just takes is to a professional. I trumpet really doesn't need to be cleaned that often.
     
  2. ca5tr0

    ca5tr0 New Friend

    47
    1
    Feb 28, 2010
    Florida
    Hey you have a serious problem there. What I'm about to tell you is a procedure I have done on my Bach Strad and on my Schilke X3... It has worked wonders for me.....

    What you do is you give it a salt bath. You fill your bath tub with hot water, (from the tap), to where it covers the horn. Take all the slides off and the valves. Place a BIG sheet of aluminum foil on the bottom. Put all the pieces in the water EXCEPT for the VALVES!!! okay, then you put in about half of the box of PURE salt, (Canning salt/ pickling salt... You can find this at wal-mart).... Then you give the salt a stir with your hand and watch the magic happen.... 20 min should be plenty of time to clean the horn.... Then you rinse the horn and all the pieces with warm water. Then dry the horn and all the pieces with a regular ole bath towel. Then you grease and oil the horn. Finally, you take a silver plate polish rag, ( you can get from almost any music store), and polish the horn. Do NOT ever use silver polish on your horn, unless you like to slowly take a thin layer of silver off. Hope this helps you, it has worked miracles with my bach strad. It had a layer of tarnish so thick that it took almost a whole box of pure salt.
     
    tedh1951 likes this.
  3. borge705

    borge705 Pianissimo User

    57
    1
    Dec 20, 2008
    INACTIVE ACCOUNT
    I agree. I'd try it again.
     
  4. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

    3,444
    1,154
    Aug 15, 2009
    Alabama
    Yes, once treat once more. Let us know the results.
     
  5. ChopsGone

    ChopsGone Forte User

    1,845
    569
    Jan 26, 2009
    Northern California
    Regarding whether to use sodium carbonate (YES) or sodium bicarbonate (maybe, if you can't find the good stuff): check the Wikipedia entry under "sodium carbonate". Salt really isn't necessary, although it's possible to use just about any salt as the electrolyte - it's just that there aren't any real added benefits to the item being cleaned. The footnoted reference where the process is spelled out in detail is:

    Richard Gardner Antiques: Caring for your Silver
     
  6. ca5tr0

    ca5tr0 New Friend

    47
    1
    Feb 28, 2010
    Florida
    The reason for "pickling salt" is that it completely dissolves. Regular table salt will not, and you may risk some serious scratch work on your Strad. It's simple chemistry, you can only dissolve so much salt into so much water. Example: When you make Sweet tea. Notice when you add tons of sugar it won't all dissolve, and you end up with a sugar paste at the bottom of the cup that everyone is guilty of consuming. Haha!... Any way, the same principle is present with the salt bath. Just be on the safe side and get your self some pickling salt.
     
  7. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

    3,444
    1,154
    Aug 15, 2009
    Alabama
    Any good Southerner knows you have to add the sugar to tea when it is hot as the saturation point is much higher. Dang Yankees! :)
    Same for dissolving salt.
     
  8. a marching trumpet

    a marching trumpet Mezzo Piano User

    529
    1
    Feb 11, 2009
    Murfreesboro, TN
    AMEN BROTHER! And my Chem teacher was out yesterday and today, they think he got sun poisoning from tennis practice. However it seems as if ya got alot of help as is from other people
     
  9. ca5tr0

    ca5tr0 New Friend

    47
    1
    Feb 28, 2010
    Florida
    Oh YAH! When I make tea at home I add it when it's hot, but when Im anywhere else I have to settle for an inch of sugar at the bottom! haha!
     

Share This Page