Blister on outside of lip??

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by rviser, Jun 27, 2009.

  1. rviser

    rviser Pianissimo User

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    Dec 26, 2008
    In short, I want to know if a blister on the outside of my lower lip can affect my playing, specifically my range. Last week I played 6 nights straight very hard and developed a blister. I took Sunday off and practiced a little Monday and played Tues and Wed of this week. The blister has gotten worse and more irritated and on Thurs and Fri I noticed I felt really weak and the higher end of my range is much harder to hit right now. Can a blister on the outside of the lip cause this? Thanks!!
     
  2. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Depends on where the blister is. Does the rim hit the blister or is it more toward the corners. If it's under the rim, you should stop playing until it's healed. If it's toward the corners, it can make the lips feel puffy affecting responce and control.
     
  3. rviser

    rviser Pianissimo User

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    Yeah, it's right in the middle. Directly underneath the red part of the lip, so close it's almost touching. So I think that would be where the rim hits it.
     
  4. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    I used to get a lot of fever blisters and some were right under the rim ,I couldn't play until they were healed, I still get them but very rarely , and now usually at the corners, when I do get them I use Viractin which is sold over the counter, it heals the blister and keeps the scab from drying out and cracking[bleeding] which would then prolong getting back to the horn.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Pain causes our bodies to compensate in unpredictable ways. Reducing the symptom of pain often allows us to to to very stupid things without realizing it.

    The most critical aspect is keeping the blister from getting infected. That really prolongs the recovery period.

    All of my periodic blister issues went away when I started playing mouthpieces with at least gold plated rims. Some players even have a gold allergy (although most of them are married to partners that have a gold addiction........). Then stainless steel seems to be an option.

    I am not advocating moving to gold plate. That is a change almost as big as switching mouthpiece size. I only mention it if there is a regular blister problem.
     
  6. rviser

    rviser Pianissimo User

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    Dec 26, 2008
    LOL, I like the comment about gold addiction. Yeah, it's pretty frustrating. As I mentioned, I played 6 nights straight last week and by the last night was strong, was playing at a personal best level in terms of endurance, power, range, etc. The blister developed on Sunday. Took Sunday off and really didn't play much Monday. Resumed playing on Tuesday night, was happy w. how I played Tues and Wed but woke up Thursday and had that swelling, non responsive, lips feel to big for my mouthpiece feeling. Last night was horrible, at the end of a solo I could be trying to hold out an f in the staff and it would make that awful grating noise, sliding off the note because the lips didn't want to maintain the buzz. It had really better be the blister, I couldn't understand any reason to go from one end of the stick to the other with my playing practically overnight :-(
     
  7. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    In addition to the risk of infection when the blister is under the rim, players may unconsciencely start moving the mpc to get away from the pain. Also the swelling may cause the mpc to move to the side. None of this is good. While I've never had a fever blister, when I was young I would get pimples at the mpc. Same problems. When it hurts to play don't play. I would say don't play until it's healed.
     
  8. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    Keep in mind that a blister does not form in the absence of any other influence. Your lips have underdone a lot of stress and the blood flow has been altered, there is fluid build-up and other factors which caused the blister and also your problems with playing. You will need to ease up to let all of this settle down. It would be similar to continuing to run with a sprained ankle - the impact just makes the condition worse. Once things are back to normal and the blister has healed, you will find that your playing is still intact. The problem will just be letting things rest long enough.
    Good luck.
     
  9. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    Fever blisters fill up with liquid and swell, once the lip swells your lips won't fit in the mouthpiece, some times at the onset of a fever blister your playing is actually easier[better] until the swelling starts, stay off the horn until you are completely healed to avoid infection and other problems caused by the mouthpiece shifting around the swelling.
     
  10. rviser

    rviser Pianissimo User

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    Dec 26, 2008
    Cool deal, thanks for all the tips and advice. I don't like having to lay off but looks like it is the only option.
     

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