Blowing = tone?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Gxman, Feb 13, 2010.

  1. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Hi

    Just wondered because I may have my wires crossed...

    I think I read or heard that a 'free' blowing trumpet is a trumpet that sacrifices tone but is used on student models so they can 'blow easier' and thus play longer than a trumpet that has resistance.

    That means the more resistance the harder to play but also the better the sound quality will be.

    *scratches head*
     
  2. uconntrpt

    uconntrpt New Friend

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    student models actually usually have more resistance built in. I think you have that backwards.
     
  3. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Student trumpets have more resistance built into the leadpipe taper which makes it easier for a student with an undeveloped embochure to control. The age of the student is not the factor.
     
  4. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    Jan 21, 2010
    So

    The more free blowing the trumpet the harder to play for a beginner but the better the tonal sound (open, rich, round etc) would be once developed as a player.

    not More resistance = better tone but more 'free' = better tone though harder to play?
     
  5. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Nope.
     
  6. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    well what the then!

    I get told mroe resistance = better tone... student trumpets = free blowing to make it easier to play...

    Now I read its the opposite to that, then get told 'no it aint that either'

    Im completely lost.
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Welcome to the TM community, Gxman, and you are not anymore lost as the rest of us!

    The idea is that we try a trumpet and, as players, decide all those funky factors for ourselves.

    Period.

    .
     
    TrumpetMonk likes this.
  8. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Hey George,

    My take is that the open rich sound you seek is going to be YOU - that's what you have in mind so that is where you will inevitably go - it doesn't really come from the trumpet per se. We kinda covered this in the PMs, but going onto the open forum will give you a much wider perspective than I can offer. I hope intelligent others chose to wade in here.

    The open rich sound that you crave comes with practice - you'll get to it but you've got a bit of work to do before you relax into that sound. The likes of Wilmer Wise may tell you that the accomplished player will get essentially the same outcome on a student horn as a professional one - and uses a professional horn because, as the player develops, the restrictions built into a student horn become unnecessary - because the muscles now do that work - but you have to do the hard yards first.

    Trumpet playing is NOT EASY - if it were then a whole lot of amateurs would be playing trumpet ....... hmmm :shock: scratches head ......... :shhh:
     
  9. ManGo

    ManGo Pianissimo User

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    That's why we have saxophones!ROFL
     
  10. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Gxman -- there's always more to the situation than is apparent at first glance. Yes, the resistance built into the instrument makes a difference, but so does the mouthpiece design as well as other factors such as bell design. So there isn't any simple answer to your question.

    More to the point than your subject line of "blow=tone?" is that "air-flow helps tone." Each person's embouchure is unique as is the formation of their mouth, so everybody has to discover how to get the best air-flow to get the tone they are looking for. And that requires that they have some concept of the tone they want to get, other than a generic "trumpet tone" which doesn't really exist.

    So if you're looking at trying out instruments, pay no attention to the specs printed on the paper, pay no attention to any salesperson saying "this horn has more resistance, that horn is more free-blowing" and simply put your mouthpiece into the horn and play it and see how it reacts to your playing style.
     

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