Body Centring

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by tedh1951, May 2, 2008.

  1. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

    7,797
    2,356
    Oct 18, 2007
    The Wide Brown Land
    I have been playing as a comeback player for a few years now and find that even in a concert band I usually choke when asked to step out of my sectional role and attempt a solo. I usually spend my working day standing in front of a classroom full of strangers and teach technical subjects to very experienced engineers, and have done for 25 years - so shyness would not seem to be a factor.

    What is going on?

    Very recently I read David Monette's dissertation on body centring and tried it at band last night whilst attempting a solo - concentrate on feet position, knee position, hip position, weight over the middle of the feet - solo proceeded just as it does in the practice room - almost perfectly (within the limits of my skill level).

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. bagmangood

    bagmangood Forte User

    More time playing front of people. We often have small things that we do to cover them up when speaking, because we don't need to use our whole body when speaking. In playing, you need to get used to opening up while the audience is there. There are many kinds of stage fright. Just play and blow
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,954
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    When you are in front of the class, you are properly prepared and confident. Your experience gives you the assurance that even if something unusual happens, you can deal with it.
    Your playing is normally buried in the section, at that moment you may not be prepared for a solo and you may not have the assurance that you can deal with the unusual.
    The thing most different when you stand is that your sound is not reflected off of the music stand back to your ears. That means you do not hear yourself in the same way and that is unsettling.
    The use of your body can increase your connection to the music process, giving you more "feedback" and that makes you more confident. try and practice more in that room standing up!

    A small practice room also generates a lot of feedback to your ears. That does not train what needs to happen in a real concert setting. Find bigger rooms to practice in. That experience will make you more confident next time!
     
  4. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

    1,502
    7
    Jun 11, 2006
    I had my best lesson in posture when I first saw/heard Allan Vizzutti play live.

    From that day on I do what Allan does, stand up straight on both feet. His feet are close together. I spread mine apart a little more. Equal weight on each foot.

    I have seen girls solo standing on one leg straight and one leg bent. I don't see how they can focus the air or concentrate on the music. They didn't play well.

    Two other people(s) to watch are Carol Dawn Reinhart and the Stoneback sisters. They have perfect standing posture when they play. I think there are some Utubes of them playing perfectly.

    Sunday is the Maynard Ferguson 80th birthday concert. I will make a point of watching posture of an entirely male section and soloists.
     
  5. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

    7,797
    2,356
    Oct 18, 2007
    The Wide Brown Land
    It is often that you ask a question for which the answer is already apparent. Thanks for confirming what many of you have been aluding to in pevious posts and I have been gradually coming to realise as a failing in my methodology - wow, have I got some unlearning to do - and a bit of Youtubing too. Keep up the fine work, and many thanks.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2008
  6. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

    1,502
    7
    Jun 11, 2006
    I just got back from the Maynard 80th birthday concert.
    Eric Miyashiro, Walter White fronted the band. They stand on both feet with the knees slightly bent.
    All the trumpet players came out into the audience and from what I could see they are stand up straight, knees bent players. Maynard is the master.
     
  7. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

    7,797
    2,356
    Oct 18, 2007
    The Wide Brown Land
    Yes, that certainly follows what David Monette has to say, and he also says that as you strive for the upper register, rather than arching your back as many of us do, you should "bend ze knees". Thanks again.
     

Share This Page