bore sizes

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by songbook, Jan 15, 2015.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,955
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    The reason that the large bore instruments seem easier is the feedback to the player that the artisan designed into them. That is much easier on a "pro" horn not primarily designed for durability........ The more advanced designed can be more efficient without "strangling" the player. I have often posted that a pro horn is NOT a good beginners or intermediate horn. The feedback possible requires good breath support and embouchure. When the brain gets involved in the servo system, the pro horn simply has great advantages.
     
  2. gunshowtickets

    gunshowtickets Forte User

    1,243
    781
    Mar 11, 2015
    Tidewater, VA
    I agree with this sentiment.

    I just got my first Harrelson, a summit c. Mr. Jason has an acclimation process. After playing on it for two days, I will say it is a very interesting, especially the feedback. It's not that heavy, either, but it's VERY efficient, just like the Buescher I got a month ago. Both seem to play themselves. I don't think I would have been able to appreciate either one to an appreciable extent when i was starting out to play...
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,119
    9,285
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    And that is so true about the Martin Committees. These horns take some taming for optimal use. The Committee is not the horn for a beginner by any means.
     
  4. Ljazztrm

    Ljazztrm Piano User

    423
    107
    Nov 15, 2003
    Queens, NY
    A lot of good comments have been made already. One thing - if you are looking to experiment with bore size and overall resistance in trumpets, I recommend looking at what most pros are using that are not 100% soloists all the time. What I see the most around my area are these two specs: The Shew specs - Bach 37 bell flare, .445 bore, 5-inch bell. The Bach Strad specs - 37 bell flare, .459(.460?) bore and 4 7/8th inch bell. These two types of configuration seem to give the optimum in sound and efficiency when you need to cover different styles of playing and are doing a lot of hard blowing. I slowly am seeing the Shew specs even surpass the Bach specs - I think it's because the blow is even more efficient and you can possibly even get a more powerful sound. I've come across a lot of classical, jazz, and lead players playing the 8310Z these days. I got this configuration on the way to me myself - right now I use a Getzen Severinsen Eterna which I am pretty positive has the Bach specs - a great, solid blowing horn I can cover everything on. Best, Lex
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,791
    3,554
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    My last two horns were medium bore horns -

    Schilke B6 - .450, stepped to .460
    Jupiter 1600i Ingram - .453 throughout

    Neither of those trumpets play tight or small - both are pretty balanced.

    With that said, my trumpet prior to the Schilke was a LB Strad at .462, and prior to that was an ML Strad at .459. I never fell that any of those trumpets felt big or small - they all just seemed fairly balanced.
     
  6. Ljazztrm

    Ljazztrm Piano User

    423
    107
    Nov 15, 2003
    Queens, NY
    IMO - both those horns are excellent for all styles of playing. My first teacher, a serious classical guy, switched to a B6 several years ago - it's a wonderful axe. And so is the Ingram - there's nothing I wouldn't hesitate to play on either of those axes. And, yes, I too never noticed them being 'big' or 'small' - just balanced axes with a regular blow - maybe had the feeling of playing very efficiently and getting a lot of sound output for what I was putting into it. Best, Lex
     
  7. Franklin D

    Franklin D Forte User

    1,714
    981
    May 23, 2009
    The Netherlands
    IMO has the Shew horn more of a 72 type bell.
     
  8. Ljazztrm

    Ljazztrm Piano User

    423
    107
    Nov 15, 2003
    Queens, NY
    Oh sorry - I think you may be right - don't know where I came up w the idea it had a 37 flare - Reading online I keep coming across 'large bell flare' - probably more of a 72 flare. Then there's the Miyashiro which cats have told me blows very big and open - I think the bell is at least 5-1/8th inches.. Probably too big for a lot of us. Best, Lex
     
  9. Franklin D

    Franklin D Forte User

    1,714
    981
    May 23, 2009
    The Netherlands
    But I am not sure it's a 72 bell. Only that the Shew horn is based/inspired by the Schilke B7 which has the Schilke L-bell.
    And my teacher played a 6310, later a 8310 which I played quite often and the horn had a big bell, anyhow not a 37 in my memories.
     

Share This Page