Bottom Jaw

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BFlinch83, Mar 7, 2006.

  1. BFlinch83

    BFlinch83 Pianissimo User

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    Dec 12, 2005
    Baltimore, MD
    Hi Manny,

    What's the best way to keep your lower jaw out while you play? I feel like when I'm fresh my jaw stays out and my chops are solid, but when I get tired my foundation crumbles.

    Any books to work from for this?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

    2,342
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    Aug 11, 2005
    Atlanta, GA
    Hey there B.....do you have a Stamp book? I would do pages 10-11 non-stop (keeping your horn on the face and breathing through your nose) for as long as you can with the sole purpose of keeping your jaw where you need it. See how long you can go before your "foundation crumbles". Do it again the next time you practice and see how much further you can go. With consistent practice over time, your muscles will memorize where they should be and your foundation crumbling will go away. Also, many method books will work for this (Clarke, Arban). It is up to you to make the concentrated effort of keeping your horn up and jaw out for as long as possible to build up the endurance.

    (Pardon me for jumping in before you Manny...... :oops:)
     
  3. W Scott

    W Scott Piano User

    488
    4
    Dec 8, 2003
    Carson City, NV.
    Hey--somebody else knows about this particular piece of torment that my trumpet teacher has had me doing for the last couple of months. It's a brutal chop builder! Masochist that I am I've learned to love this beast---I go from a 'G' in the staff to a high 'C', taking about ten minutes to play.

    (oops, :sorry: Manny hasn't replied yet..)
     
  4. wilcox96

    wilcox96 Mezzo Piano User

    569
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    Oct 31, 2005
    charlotte nc
    Too bad Manny can't just devote his entire existence to this forum so we could all get some timely answers! (hahhahahaha)... :-P

    Jaw out?? I did not realize this was a prerequisite to trumpet playing! I would have had my dentist give me the Sammy Davis Jr treatment years ago! (underbite)....

    Exaggeration...true. But I was curious to the fascination/need for this. Perhaps it's the concept of a flat chin...but will see what you all have to say.
     
  5. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

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    Aug 11, 2005
    Atlanta, GA
    It is basically a consideration for those with an over bite. Pushing the jaw forward gives you an even playing surface and straightens out the air stream (as opposed to blowing downstream). Some folks play with their horn angled down to make up for this rather than push the jaw forward. If you notice on the little Monette film that featured Manny and others, there was an incredible player named Urban Agnes. His horn angle was pointing down quite severely, but he sounded great. I don't know for a fact, but I would venture to guess that his horn angle is determined by his bite and/or teeth formation.
     
  6. wilcox96

    wilcox96 Mezzo Piano User

    569
    2
    Oct 31, 2005
    charlotte nc
    Okay....I suspected as much. I have seen that video...you're right. Good stuff.

    Thanks for that....(must cancel my dental appt...;-)
     
  7. W Scott

    W Scott Piano User

    488
    4
    Dec 8, 2003
    Carson City, NV.
    Oh boy---I'm doing something weird again. I have an overbite, but I don't play with the jaw forward as far as I know. In fact, when I really get going the bell of my horn goes waaaay up. Maybe it's because I have a gap betwen my two front teeth that I can play this way?! Who knows, the sound is great and it's probably just one more reason my trumpet teacher calls me 'Enigma'. :-?
     
  8. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    What's important is to recognize why people do things regarding the embouchure and jaw set-up. What we want to distinguish between is the player that points their horn one way or the other because they started out ther first two years with a music stand that was too close to them and the person who has a mouth that is not average-looking when it comes to playing trumpet.

    If someone merely has a bad habit for no good reason then it may be a good thing for them to even out the jaw position by pronouncing the word "TOO" clearly and emphatically instead of "TER" (rhymes with "Stir").

    That's all I'm advocating and in slight degrees, at that.

    Pronouncing TOO helps the entire embouchure maintain contact with the entire rim and that leads to fuller vibrations and cuts down on attacks that go to air.

    ML
     
  9. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

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    Aug 11, 2005
    Atlanta, GA
    Believe it or not, that gap between your teeth can be an asset more than you know. Trust me.......W "Enigma" Scott. ;-)
     
  10. trumpetpat

    trumpetpat Pianissimo User

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    Nov 17, 2005
    Maine

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