Brass Players Clean Your Horns

Discussion in 'Trumpet Repair and Modification' started by farnellnewton, Oct 23, 2014.

  1. farnellnewton

    farnellnewton Piano User

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    Last edited: Oct 23, 2014
  2. FireandAir

    FireandAir Pianissimo User

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    Thank you, this is very helpful. I'm afraid that I'm still in the mindset that tells me that dunking a musical instrument in water is a heinous act -- never played brass before. I need to get over that.
     
  3. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    Not entirely sure that dunking ME in water once a month is not an heinous act. But I am a crusty old fart.
     
  4. Smrtn

    Smrtn Pianissimo User

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    That guy's horn looked disgusting! I'm taking that advice onboard.
     
  5. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    When assembling a trumpet, please make certain the valves are in before inserting the slides.
     
  6. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

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    Oops... I usually put valves in last. Is the concern that you could puch the csing out of round? I don't think I've ever had to force anything when it comes to slides, and I am always sure to lubricate well first. Elaborate, please.
     
  7. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Why? I don't see that it would make a difference, but if there's a good reason, I'd be glad to know it.
     
  8. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    MY attitude is a little anal, I admit. But if it is advice going to the general public, I stand by it. And I practice it NO MATTER WHAT THE MAKE AND MODEL!

    The reason to do this is that it is possible for the casings to buckle if too much force is used to insert the slides, for instance if the 2nd slide has to be "wobbled" in. Having the valves in place gives more strength to the casing and helps avoid that damage.

    The same advice applies for disassembly. Always leave the valves in until all slides are removed.
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Really? Are valve case walls that thin? I suppose it makes sense from a theoretical standpoint, but in practical usage it probably doesn't matter much unless you are dealing with bigger instruments - tuba for example - with bigger slides and larger valve casings.

    In my experience it has never mattered, but you are the brass tech, not me, so I'll keep it in mind in the future.
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Renold Schilke was very adamant about tight valves. Squeezing the valve block too hard caused valves from his period to occasionally hang.....

    I can imagine a Calliccio having similar issues. Bach, never........

     

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