BRASS PLAYERS: Give your horn a bath!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by farnellnewton, Jan 23, 2011.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    You ask an interesting question. The authors of the Chest article did study a total of 8 instruments, but they did not comment or specifically mention as to the plating of these instruments. Microbe growth however would be alone the internal surface of the brass tubing, so I would think it would be unlikely that the surface plating would have an effect on the protected internal environment of a brass instrument.
     
  2. Terrizzi

    Terrizzi New Friend

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    Doesn't the silver plating go inside the horn also?
     
  3. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    I don't think horns are plated on the inside-just externally. Look down the leadpipe with the tuning slide pulled. One thing one has to be careful about using someone who doesn't plate horns for a living is to NOT get plating inside the valve casings.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    No, not really. This is an excerpt from a website that gives details of a silver plated horn:
    Many professional trumpets are silver-plated, so it is important that you know how to properly care for a silver-plated instrument. Additionally, it is necessary to keep the inside of your instrument clean, as acids in saliva will deteriorate the brass.

    Read more: How to Clean a Silver Plated Trumpet | eHow.com How to Clean a Silver Plated Trumpet | eHow.com
     
  5. trumpettrax

    trumpettrax Piano User

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    Wouldn't keeping the horn rinsed everyday prevent the critter build up? This I would hope to be in conjunction with a cleaning once a month.

    Just sayin,
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    The medical evidence published in September 2010 medical journal of the American Thoracic Society "Chest" using the highest quality N-of-1 analysis is clear: The answer is No. Only using 91% isopropyl alcohol in the final rinse has been demonstrated to adequately maintain critter control.
     

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