"Brassy" sound- good or bad?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Haste2, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    This is what I've always thought of as "brassy" (in a bad way) ..... The beginning trumpet player's brassy splattering. I think maybe we all went through that period as beginners.

    But "brassy" (in a good way) to me means that it has life and sizzle and edge to it ...... It's a TRUMPET for G's sake ..... It's not a flute, it's not supposed to be mellow (unless the piece calls for it). That "brassiness" is the EXCITEMENT in the instrument.:play:



    Turtle
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The normal path of development is to get basic playing skills, then join a band. In the process of playing with others, we develop a "feel" for what works and what is annoying. If we don't we are a basket case. After that "junior band" we continue to get better and join something more advanced - more feedback for those that are paying attention. After a while, if we are interested, an opportunity comes up to play with a jazz band - new input for those that are awake.

    You ask about a "brassy" sound. What other option does any trumpet have? Woody?, Plasticky? Concretey? Stoney?

    What we always want is to be surrounded by people that love our sound, sense of timing and personality. We do not find that on the internet. Make YOUR audience happy and you will be just fine.
     
  3. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    Describing a brassy sound is rather like describing the color blue. What shade are you going to describe?
    Rich T.
     
  4. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    The general rule is as follows:


    Music director dressed casual? Brassy sound.


    Dressed in hip sport jacket? Brassy sound.


    Standard professional suit? Less brassy.


    Cardigan sweater? Much more mellow


    Leotards and tights? Spandex? Mellow cornet/flugel horn. Bach 1 or Schilke 22 mouthpiece cup depth or larger. If still too penetrating tone? Send him a box of Ghiradelli or Lady Godiva chocolate (here: Godiva chocolate, gourmet chocolate gifts and truffles at Godiva.com) That and some pink roses...
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2011
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Brassy is Classy! That's why I choose the trumpet as my main instrument, yes even years after starting out on the Hammond B-3!
     
  6. sorahauk

    sorahauk New Friend

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    If you are referring to a sharp, staccato, bright sound, then that would be good for marching band.

    But For concert band, you would like a dark, warm, rich, syrupy chocolaty sound.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Well I guess that eliminates "Bugler's Holiday" for concert band.
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I love it! I was wondering how long before someone said it as I pulled the post!!ROFL
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2011
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    So what am I? Chopped liver? That's what I said in post 15: "Brassy is Classy! That's why I choose the trumpet as my main instrument, yes even years after starting out on the Hammond B-3!"
     
  10. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Fraser posted that in #8, I was just smiling as I responded. I hadn't read the entire post yet. You are more than chopped liver to me (and others I'm sure)! :grouphug: Can I Get A Witneeeeeeess (B-3 says, "Dun-Dunt")!!?? :lol:
     

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