Breaking in a new horn?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by The Lick, May 6, 2012.

  1. The Lick

    The Lick New Friend

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    Nov 5, 2011
    Toronto, Ontario
    Hi everyone
    I picked up a new Phaeton trumpet about 4-5 months ago and I'm still getting relatively sticky keys when playing for more than 20 minutes.
    I've played it essentially every day since I bought it, oiled it every day for the first month or so, and it seems like whenever I'm blowing air the keys don't feel like moving.
    It's kind of frustrating because a friend of mine picked up a new Schilke B1 and it's perfect already.. BLAH!
    Anyways, I'm just curious to see if anyone knows and tricks/solutions that can help me get rid of the valve issues!
    Thanks :play:
     
  2. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    If my valves are sticking after oiling, I assume there debris that needs to be removed. Get a lint-free cloth, wipe off the valves, swab the valve casings, and then re-oil. Until it's broken in, this might be a better daily oiling routine for the Phaeton.

    Mike
     
  3. acarcido

    acarcido Forte User

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    I agree with TrumpetMD, I suspect debris is the valves. Give the entire horn a good bath and clean. Rinse and dry it thoroughly then re-oil and and grease up the slides. I am betting that is the issue.
     
  4. patkins

    patkins Forte User

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    Those above have beat me to it, Bravo! Yes you need to wipe down new valves as they are breaking in. Microscopic metal and/or debris will interfere. If condition persist, I would take it to were I bought it for a check in just to make sure ther was no manufacturer's defect. Phaeton trumpets are still rather new, but appear to be priced reasonably.
    Schilke's are more consistent. I've owned to and have had no regrets. I sense your frustration. Hopefully it is just a ripple and will resolve itself. Best Regards!
     
  5. The Lick

    The Lick New Friend

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    Nov 5, 2011
    Toronto, Ontario
    Thanks for the quick responses
    @Mike, should I be wiping the valves with a lint-free cloth until they are completely dry? And do you have any ideas on how I can get up into the casing to clean that out?
    I looked through the casing just a few minutes ago for the first time in a few weeks and was surprised at the amount of dark, gooey-like substance in it.

    @Acarcido, I'll try to give it a bath tomorrow, hopefully that will work!
     
  6. patkins

    patkins Forte User

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    Yes, wipe it with a lent free clothe. I wipe my horns down whenever I since I'm having to oil to frequently or they are simply new or rebuilt valves. The dark stuff is microscopic metal fragments and debris.
     
  7. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I purchased a stack of lint-free cloths at the local auto parts store. I suspect the local Target or K-Mart or WalMart would have these as well.

    I just gently wipe each valve with the cloth. I use the H.W. Brass Saver Cleaning Brush to clean the valve casings. Then I re-oil.

    Mike
     
  8. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    I'm not Mike but the idea is to wipe down the piston so that you remove any oil+fine debris without scratching it, and not leaving anything new behind on the piston.
    Remove the pistons and the bottom caps and you can sight straight down through the valve casings. You can pull your soft lint-free cloth through the casings to clean them out.
    That doesn't sound good. If it's truly gooey (as in a bit thick, or sticky) then you will want to give your horn a bath and use the right kind of brushes/cloths to clean it.
    I'm not Acarcido, but I hope you washed your trumpet when you got it at least! In addition to more frequent baths (search this site (Trumpetmaster) for recommended techniques) you are hopefully observing good oral hygiene when playing - i.e. not playing with food or soda on your teeth from a recent meal. (Some players recommend brushing and flossing before playing, others that you wash food down with a good drink of water some 30+ minutes before playing etc).

    I hope you get your valve issues sorted out so they don't return.

    --bumblebee
     
  9. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Jun 22, 2011
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    The Lick,
    All of the above is great advice. There has been quite a lot of discussion about this and similar topics in the last couple months. When my 2009 Blessing BTR-ML1 was new, the manufacturer's instructions were quite clear concerning expectations. Regular cleaning, frequent wiping of valves and swabbing of casings, and oiling, along with a suggested break-in period of 30 to 45 days were main points. I faithfully and patiently did all that, and put up with the mild frustration. 30 to 45 days later, right on schedule, the valves were performing up to my level of expectation. Now, quite frankly, they are a delight. I can scarcely wait to practice each day. A couple other things may be helpful: experiment with different oils and viscosities; be sure to clean the small tubes between valves. I used Hetman Light Piston Lubricant 1 for a while, though now I am using Hetman Piston Lubricant 2. Good luck!
    Jim
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Sticky valves on a new horn are not acceptable in the 21st Century. Manufacturing tolerances are much cheaper to maintain than ever before.

    If we examine what can make the valves stick, Ivan Hunter has often posted the 3 Ds: Damage, Debris, Distortion. I recommend taking the whole horn apart and giving it a bath. Run the snake through the bell too. During the bell bending process, there can be residue left. Look for scratches on the valve. That would indicate the casing not being deburred properly during assembly. Make sure that the valve and casing are bone dry when you oil. Lubricants float on water. If there is any moisture on the valve, there will be no protective film of oil between it and the casing. Adding oil to the sludge does not help. Bone dry is the only solution!
     

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