Breaking in a new horn?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by The Lick, May 6, 2012.

  1. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

    5,242
    1,791
    Nov 7, 2009
    San Pedro
    I had a problem with sludge with my Bach last year ... my valve oil was reacting with my slide grease. Some lanolin slide cremes can react with petroleum based valve oils and create a black sludge. I cleaned out my horn, as was stated above, and switched to Hetmen's valve oil and slide oil. I think any quality brand like Ultra Pure would do as well ..but my experience was with Hetmen's. Problem fixed..no sticky valves..no more sludge.
     
  2. nordlandstrompet

    nordlandstrompet Forte User

    1,839
    221
    Apr 5, 2008
    Norway
    This is a part of the flyer I provide together with all new instruments.
    The full recipe is written in an easy understandable text inside the flyer.
    The flyer is put inside the box, on top of the instrument.
    "Warning text" in red letters.

    (There is also a manual about daily maintenance, a few words about oils, and how to oil the valves).

    "A new instrument has to follow the recipe for periodic maintenance within two weeks,
    and repeated within 4 weeks from being put into service.
    This must be done for any manufacturing residue to be washed out and the valves
    shall be cleansed of the black coating that will come during the break in period."
     
    bumblebee likes this.
  3. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

    5,242
    1,791
    Nov 7, 2009
    San Pedro
    That flyer sounds like great information for a "sticky" ...no pun intended
     
  4. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

    7,801
    2,360
    Oct 18, 2007
    The Wide Brown Land
    If you want it to be sticky you may need to use flyer paper :dontknow:
     
  5. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

    3,936
    1,830
    Jan 21, 2010
    Great Southern Land
    By the way, when I read "breaking in a new horn" it reminded me of a conversation I had once with a shoe seller who told me he would help break clients' shoes in using a hammer to soften up the leather around the heel.

    By the way, Cooler (;-)) , what Hetman's are you using? I haven't tried it yet but one manufacturer recommended Hetman's #1 to me.

    --bumblebee
     
  6. Dave Mickley

    Dave Mickley Forte User

    Age:
    68
    1,298
    279
    Nov 11, 2005
    Indianapolis
    every once in a while after I bathe my horn I will clean my valves and swab out the valve casings with Isopropyl Alcohol, it does wonders. to remove stains from the valves I soak them [up to the springs but not on the felts] in white vinegar for about 15 minutes then clean with dish soap, rinse and oil. Good Luck.
    p.s. so far stains haven't created any loss of function of the valves in any of MY horns but I just remove the stains for looks.
     
  7. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

    Age:
    68
    3,017
    3,590
    Jun 11, 2006
    South Salem, NY
    My suggested causes, Dirt, Damage, Distortion, apply to well settled and well made horns. We are seeing a lot of product from the East which doesn't always meet appropriate standards. You may need to visit your local tech to check whether the initial build quality and fit of the valves is good. How round and straight are the valves and casings? Are there any pitted holes on the valve surface or at the join of the valve ports? Are the casings under stress?
     
  8. curdog

    curdog New Friend

    24
    0
    Apr 19, 2010
    Carthage, Texas
    Sticky valves may also be caused by manufacture defect. The once great Olds Company made some crummy valves back in the 70's and it finished off the company. I had an Olds Custom Crafted Trumpet in the 70's, loved the tone I got from it, but sold it because it had sticky valves. I bought a Schilke B1 and hated its sharp, tinny sound. I searched for years and found another Olds Custom. It, too, had sticky valves! I brought it to a tech in Baton Rouge and he told me the valves were unfixable. He had worked with them for several days, but you could see the strange mis-shape in the valves. To fix the problem he took some valves out of an Olds Recording trumpet and that sucker now has the tone of warm butter and its valves are, as he said, "the best in the business." I suggest you get that horn to a doctor and get it checked out as quickly as possible.
     

Share This Page