Breaking in my new Calicchio

Discussion in 'Horns' started by Lars, Apr 9, 2004.

  1. Lars

    Lars New Friend

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    Apr 9, 2004
    Pittsburgh, PA
    I'm due to receive my new Calicchio any day now, and was wondering if any special steps need to be taken with a new horn. Do I need to do anything special to the valves? Should I clean the horn before I play it?
    thanks

    Lars
     
  2. Larry Gianni

    Larry Gianni Piano User

    265
    4
    Nov 11, 2003
    Los Angeles
    Hi Lars,

    Usually , when a trumpet comes from the shop brand new it's been cleaned both chemically and with there ulta-sonic process so if pretty immaculate inside.

    But - Here's the biggie - it probably has some of Dave Johnson's spit in it from testing it before it goes out and I would now classify it as certifiable " petri dish " for minimally a very toxic strain of " Escherichia Coli and maybe the " Nile virus " to bout. ( plus maybe some things you pick up in Branson if you play there long enough - know what I mean ? )

    So to be safe, take it apart , give it a bath in some warm water and anti-bacterial detergent, brush out the slides and valve casing, rinse it off with clean tap water ( Pittsburgh , maybe not possible ), grease up the slides with what I use , plumber's grease that is used on brass valve stems by plumbers ( buy it at any hardware store ) and it holds consistency past 180 degree hot water - on the third valve slide, drip a little valve oil on it with the plumbers grease ,to loosen up the plumbers grease so it slides easy - and use lots or your favorite valve oil and you should be ready to put it thru its paces.

    When the valves are breaking in to the angle of your specific downstroke, wipe them off frequently with " cheese cloth " or " cotton diapers " ( my personal favorite ) so that the really tiny break-in grit won't hang up the valves and use alot of oil ( enough to let it drip out the bottom valve cap ) until it doesn't get slightly "dark" anymore - probably a month or so.

    OH, don't wear your white pants during the oiling part.

    Have fun and put it thru it's paces - no need to baby your new " hot-rod "

    Lg
     
  3. MPM

    MPM Pianissimo User

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    Nov 10, 2003
    Larry,

    Cotton diapers? I hope you took them off your kids first (hahaha).

    Lars,

    Larry is 100% correct. And you might want to ask Dave if he had just eaten "Oscars" or a "Prime Rib Sandwich from Pzazz" right before play testing your horn. :wink:

    But seriously, Larrys advice about the valve care, even on a horn that will be as well made as your new Calicchio, is absolute! I personally submerged my valves in a glass of Jack Daniels, straight up, played as long as I could before the valves started to feel a little ugly, then would wash them with regular Dawn dishwashing liquid, rinse the valve & the valve casings in hot water (from the sink tap) then re-oil and repeat.
     
  4. Lars

    Lars New Friend

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    Apr 9, 2004
    Pittsburgh, PA
    No kidding about the 'Hot Rod' comment. I had my first gig with my new 1s2.
    Wow.
    I had been playing a 1964 Bach 37 for the past 10 years. What a difference. I was peeling paint all over the place.
    Great horn. The valves are a bit sticky, but the sound is amazing.
     
  5. MPM

    MPM Pianissimo User

    247
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    Nov 10, 2003
    Just break the valves into your fingers the way Larry said to ... they'll be fine.
     
  6. Larry Gianni

    Larry Gianni Piano User

    265
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    Nov 11, 2003
    Los Angeles
    Lars,

    Trumpets made by small companies ie: Calicchio, Blackburn, etc. that make all of their own parts - especially valves and valve casings - make the valve tolerances very tight - as tight as possible - and each piston is hand lapped into the casings so every set of valves are especially fitted to that particular casing ( ie: serial numbered trumpet ).

    That's why the break in period for a custom / hand made trumpet takes a little longer and needs a little more care than a production line trumpet.

    Production trumpets seem to have much more " plug and play " valves that don't take a long break period to feel normal. Just keep wiping the valve down and get a cleaning rod and wipe out the casings with any type cloth that doesn;t leave any lint ( ie: cheese cloth / cotton cloth ) until the dark residue is mostly gone and you'll have valves that last a life-time.

    LG

    Oh by the way , after you dip the valves in the Jack Daniels , drink what's left and you won't worry about your valves anymore.
     
  7. rhdroc

    rhdroc Pianissimo User

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    Nov 17, 2003
    Central Pennsylvania
    Valve Question

    Can anyone tell me why Calicchio doesn't mark their valve 1,2,&3? I've looked all over the valves and cannot find any numbering of any kind. The valve cylinders are clearly marked (exterior) but not the valves themselves.

    Every time I wash my horn, I carefully line up the valves so I can remember their order but, without fail, they always get mixed them up. Without the numbers, they're a son-of-a-gun to replace in the valve cylinders.

    Am I missing the numbers or is there a good reason for not numbering them?? Maybe there's a trick I'm not aware of?? My Hollywood 1s2 was the same way :?

    Thanks---<Rick
     
  8. Vessehune

    Vessehune Pianissimo User

    192
    0
    Oct 31, 2003
    Sunnyside, WA
    I know on my Hollywood 1s/7 it is very difficult to find the numbers, but they are there. They are in very tiny font and not imprinted very deep. I would pull out either the 3rd or 2nd valve and just look very carefully for the number. Sometimes it is still difficult for me to find the number on the 1st valve.
     

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