Breathing issues

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by the newbie, Dec 21, 2011.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    STUPID RESPONSE!!!!!!!!! I take that back: EXTREMELY STUPID RESPONSE!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Having air left over is not generally a function of breathing too deeply. It is a function of not getting and using the air correctly.

    Step one: Longtones. Breathe in as deeply as possible and hold a middle G at medium volume - play til you run out of air. That works, right? What is the difference then between an Arbans exercize and a long tone? YOU! You are probably tensing up during breathing and staying tense afterwards.

    Start your practice sessions with longtones and lip slurs. Breathe deeply and use all of your air. Get used to that feeling, then add articulation to the RELAXED playing. A teacher should be monitoring this, not some internet blogger with no real interest in YOUR progression.
     
  2. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    How is that Stupid????? You take in what you need to get you to the next breath mark or rest. That is pretty damn smart in my eyes. You do not need extra air to sit in your lungs.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Cody,
    it is stupid because you are ignoring everything that is required to play well. You are mixing up symptoms with problems. Breath support is not the same as filling up various sized coke glasses. Just try what I said with the long tones. By the way, we learn to breathe starting with big - not weak and wimpy. THis players problems will only get worse when they compensate for tension with even less air.
     
  4. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    I dont breath in a lot of air, but I use pressure. I dont think you need to pack your lungs full of air to play. I understand to take a big breath, I do when I begin. Then I just take what I need and keep going.

    And I do play well, even without a huge breath every time.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Cody,
    more BS doesn't help. I just think that you and I have a much different opinion about what "well" is. After 35+ years of teaching, I think that I have seen enough bad examples. No need for you to repeat them. Big relaxed breath is the key recommended by almost every decent teacher on the planet. I am sure that you are no exception to the rule. Try what I said. It may take you a while to figure it out, you will never go back afterwards.
     
  6. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    I will try it and let you how I like it.
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Exactly! Why put more gasoline in our cars than we need to get to the next gas station?

    (Sorry, but I couldn't help but be facetious.) Brass players often talk about "tanking up" regarding breathing--what we do with that full tank varies from instrument to instrument and register to register. Regardless of the instrument, lower tones seem to require more volume of air, higher tones more air pressure. Simple physics at work. Take a couple buckets, fill them with water, and poke different sized holes in them at the same spot and observe the difference. Repeat the same with a couple of plastic cups. Which of the two is wimpier, the bucket or the glass?
     
  8. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    Okay Okay, I get the point.
     
  9. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    nvm, weird post
     
  10. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    But just to drive it home, my experienced, accomplished teacher/mentor says exactly the same thing.

    --bumblebee
     

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