Breathing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by AKtrumpet, Aug 3, 2010.

  1. AKtrumpet

    AKtrumpet Piano User

    311
    67
    Jun 4, 2010
    Alaska
    I've been told you should breath in from the corners of your mouth but am not sure why...

    Any ideas?
     
  2. Mamba21500

    Mamba21500 Piano User

    317
    13
    Feb 26, 2009
    When you play, if you need to snatch a breath in the middle of a passage, or even if you have a bar or so, it would take to much time to take the instrument of your chops, take a breath and then put it back on, you keep the mouthpiece on your chops so you don't have to reset when you take it off, but then you can't breathe through the trumpet (well you can, but not much) so you've got to breathe through the corners of your mouth.
     
  3. rettepnoj

    rettepnoj Fortissimo User

    2,771
    851
    Feb 22, 2009
    Norway
    According to Arturo Sandoval's book Brass Playing Concepts, you should only breath trough your nose!
     
  4. Mamba21500

    Mamba21500 Piano User

    317
    13
    Feb 26, 2009
    Each to their own I suppose, I can't get enough air in through my nose to play if I don't have much time to breathe. having a nose is useful for circular breathing though :roll:
     
  5. rettepnoj

    rettepnoj Fortissimo User

    2,771
    851
    Feb 22, 2009
    Norway
    Dont work for me neither!
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,948
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    This is actually very simple.

    When we breathe through our noses, the air is filtered, moisturized, the stream is slowed down and the temperature is increased. When we breathe through our mouths, none of this happens.

    Our body has both mechanisms for specific reasons. Our normal breathing is through the nose. We have time and it requires "little" energy. When we have a higher demand for oxygen because of physical activity, we breathe through our mouths. This is normally accompanied by more energy burning and a higher heart rate.

    When we play, the same mechanisms CAN apply if we practice them. When we have time, it is advantageous to breathe through the nose. When we have to knock walls down, we have our mouths. When breathing through our mouths, we stretch the lip tissue. We have to make sure that the embouchure is formed before playing again. Stretched tissue does not let the blood flow as freely. This lets the muscles get tired more quickly.

    Only when we practice both can they be freely interchanged.
     
  7. mchs3d

    mchs3d Mezzo Forte User

    988
    262
    Sep 30, 2005
    Provo, UT
    Breath through the nose? Really? I know Arturo is a fantastic player, but I am never going to do that. I like to take breaths through the sides of my lips, in the style of the music I am playing. I think the important thing is to not reset the embouchure.
     
  8. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

    5,065
    1,005
    Jun 6, 2010
    Oregon
    Breathing through the corners of my mouth tends to dry out my lips/mouth. Breathing through my nose fixes this entirely. Problems are: a. My private teacher tells me not to breathe through my nose, b. Hard to get a FAST deep breath this way. Other than that, breathing through the nose is great. Even though my teacher tells me not to, I do it anyway. Hey, I'm in charge here. It's my money, not his (until the lessons's over :-))

    Turtle
     
  9. porterjack

    porterjack New Friend

    14
    0
    Jul 30, 2010
    anyone learn circular breathing as in didgeridoo players

    is it an asset or trumpet playing?
     
  10. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

    5,065
    1,005
    Jun 6, 2010
    Oregon
    My friend Russ can circular breathe while playing the dig ...... But the embouchure (sp?) is much looser, where the lips are sort of flapping rather than buzzing. I'm guessing trumpet is a LOT harder. My cousin Richard, a master on the Shakuhachi flute, doesn't have any interest in learning circular breathing. I don't either. My lungs are plenty big enough .... better to learn "air management" I think.

    Turtle
     

Share This Page