Breathing.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Trumpetplayer24, Jul 28, 2013.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Obesity does not "displace" air, it restricts the diaphragms ability to drop. You need this expansion to open the terminal air sacs in the lung. There are many many of these in clusters that when added up has more surface area than any volume displacement could come close to matching. If you are a thin person and don't take in deep breaths, the same thing will happen. Using the exercises I mentioned above will open much more of these airways whether you are thin or obese. The factual physics (physiology) behind the Gmonady Raw of Power.
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    No disagreement! I did not say I was displacing air ... I said I was displacing the space the lung occupies vis constriction by the diaphragm due to fat is exactly so. There just isn't enough force in inhalation to compress the excess fat as would allow full inflation of the lung. Yes, indeed you need all those nooks open to attain maximum lung capacity of good deep breathing.
     
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Long tones and blowing through a swizzle stick (mini mini mini straw used for coffee) will help. Having a lot of air without knowing how to release it will just give you a headache, literally. What happens to a balloon with too much air? It's not how much air can I suck in but how efficient can I be with what I have. Only practice will tell you what you need. Study articles by successful players and how they breath and glean from that because everybody is a little different.
     
  4. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Sorry Doc, that's the one point where we can't come together.
    It's all right to lift your arms before breath exercise, just to get the tissues going; but for actual endurance, it's the diaphragm that matters. And diaphragm control can be lost by raising your arms.
     
  5. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Don't worry about lung capacity - that is only a problem if you've had some kind of lung disease. Main thing for endurance is diaphragm control. The best people to teach you about this are vocal coaches, so get down, look for a good one and learn singing. Singing and trumpet playing can be fruitful for each other - my partner is a professional opera singer with a long and exciting career in title parts, and she now started on cornet and hey presto! suddenly she can sing parts that were impossible six months ago - including all the murderous Wagner parts.
    So once again: Start singing!
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Tiny bubbles.... In the wine....
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I do not disagree with you at all... In fact I am spot on with what you are saying... Read what I posted carefully, as you are right in assuming I am wrong if you don't do the step that follows when actually playing:

    After lifting the shoulders to take in the full breath... then relax the shoulders before you start playing... In this way, you fill up with more vital capacity, then let the diaphragm take over as your arms will no longer be raised.

    Also be it known that most trumpet players do play with their arms raised... except for Miles Dave's that often time played stooped over, serenading his shoes.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Again, the quote you use in posting this caution was related to an EXERCISE. I agree, I would NEVER recommend playing this way. Rather do the exercise first, then go to the normal playing dynamics. This exercise DOES increase vital capacity. That is like adding extra compartment to your fuel tank, and the OP was wanting to last longer on one breathe. This is the best way I know of to do that. This breathing exercise also helps to keep anxiety in check, which is another cause of running out of air. When taking an anxious breathe, vital capacity is low.
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Lung capacity is a problem if I understand the OP's original statement: "I really struggle with taking deep enough breaths during playing. I often run out of air..." You only run out of air if you don't have enough air to begin with - Vital Capacity.

    Tell that to my patient I currently have in the ICU that is on 6 liters of oxygen because she has such a large abdominal tumor that her diaphragm is constricted from moving. Oh yeah... by the way... she has normal lungs.
     
  10. motteatoj

    motteatoj Mezzo Forte User

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    I had this problem.....
    Do what I did.....buy a sousaphone and learn it too.
    Trumpet breathing is just fine now, no issues.
    I was having my sousaphone repaired and i started getting shallow breaths/run out of breath issues again.
    As soon as i got my BIG horn back, problem gone again.

    I know, a bit extreme but it is FUN and WORKS.

    J
     

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