British Brass band Cornet options

Discussion in 'Horns' started by Sidekick, Aug 30, 2013.

  1. rankamateur

    rankamateur Mezzo Forte User

    981
    283
    May 1, 2013
    Merry Ol' England
    Now you've done it, you cad! How dare you! Flugels at dawn!

    Hang on...weren't you drooling over that Courtois trumpet on Ebay just a couple of weeks ago?
     
  2. rankamateur

    rankamateur Mezzo Forte User

    981
    283
    May 1, 2013
    Merry Ol' England
    I think I'd change my vote as regards a cornet exclusively for a BBB. I've had an off-day as regards playing today as it is. So anyway, I've been comparing my Chambord to my old B&H Sovereign (round stamp) and I will concede, the Chambord does sound more like a trumpet (It even looks like a cornet version of the Legende). At least, it does the way I have been playing it today. The Sovereign does have a more old-fashioned BBB sound to it, so I will change my vote to that: Boosey & Hawkes Sovereign. They are not that easy to come by though.

    I've never played an Aquae Svlis but I believe they are pretty good and I trust Brian's judgement.
     
  3. gbshelbymi

    gbshelbymi Mezzo Piano User

    642
    380
    Jan 3, 2013
    Travelers Rest, SC
    I'm using a CarolBrass 3880 in my brass band, second solo chair. Currently using a Yamaha David King mouthpiece with it to good effect. The Carol is VERY mpc sensitive. It was too bright with a Curry 3BBC. but the Yamaha is working well tonally.
     
  4. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

    4,328
    4,326
    Jul 5, 2010
    Vienna, Austria, Europe
    Well, I know quite a bit about Philip McCann and the background he came from, having played in the same band with him and his buddy Alex Melville (who sadly passed away a few days ago). They had to fight their way into music under unbelievable circumstances, being miners with Kinneil Colliery in Scotland.
    For those who don't know anything about Kinneil: It was a coal mine near the Firth of Forth, with some of the narrowest coal faces in mining history. At some points, the coal thickness is just around 25 inches, and they were not wasting labour to enlarge the room for the miners. They were working twelve-hour shifts in unbelievably cramped positions, lying flat on their bellies and hewing the coal sideways because there was no room to wield tools any other way. Every man on the face had a mate called a "puller" whose task it was to get him out after four hours or so, then they changed positions, always with the wooden props crackling around them and showing the rock (which is not very stable at Kinneil!) was steadily pushing downwards... After twelve hour shifts they met and played in their band. And under these conditions they made the mine profitable, until Margaret Thatcher's government decided that coal mining (and the resultant unions) were a thing of the past. Most of the miners were just flung onto the streets and were unemployed with woefully inadequate benefits (watch "Brassed Off", which shows what went on in England; in Scotland, conditions were not quite as rosy. Many Kinneil players who had saved for years to buy their own instruments had to pawn or sell them; the bandhall fell into disrepair and the band was in danger of dissolution. Yet they managed to keep the band going, reorganize life in Bo'ness (where the band is located). And Philip McCann, with this kind of background, not only managed to become an internationally renowned cornet soloist, but a conductor with a University professorship... I think he has every right to the respect he is demanding. If you get to know him closer, he is a fabulous guy, always returning for his native band's annual concerts and supporting them in every way... thanks, Phil!
     
  5. gbshelbymi

    gbshelbymi Mezzo Piano User

    642
    380
    Jan 3, 2013
    Travelers Rest, SC
    "I've earned the right to be a crotchety prick, thank you very much!" :thumbdown:
     
  6. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

    1,990
    1,292
    Jul 18, 2011
    UK
    Barliman, while this is not the place for politics. Harold Wilson closed more Pits than Margaret Thatcher did!
     
  7. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

    5,250
    4,562
    Aug 7, 2013
    Lagos, Nigeria
    "88.2% of Statistics are made up on the spot" - Vic Reeves
     
  8. rankamateur

    rankamateur Mezzo Forte User

    981
    283
    May 1, 2013
    Merry Ol' England
    That's Mr McCann to you, Barliman! Joking aside, if you have to 'demand' respect, then you don't 'have' respect. Respect has nothing to do with titles. I know this on a personal level because I am, by profession, a school teacher. I may insist upon the title of 'Sir' or 'Mr', but true respect does not lie within a word, but within the person and the deeds that person carries out. True respect is something you cannot force on people.

    I don't know Phillip McCann beyond what I have heard of his music, and the odd story here and there I have heard about him. He is an excellent player, although not always to my taste.

    Oh, and I was in 'Brassed Off'. My (literally) 5 seconds of fame!
     
  9. rankamateur

    rankamateur Mezzo Forte User

    981
    283
    May 1, 2013
    Merry Ol' England
    'Still thinking about that pit?'
     
  10. rankamateur

    rankamateur Mezzo Forte User

    981
    283
    May 1, 2013
    Merry Ol' England
    I've heard a lot of very good things about Carol Brass. Maybe they will be the new Yamaha!
     

Share This Page