Brushed Satin/Scratch Finish (do it yourself)

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Horn of Praise, Dec 28, 2003.

  1. Ash

    Ash Pianissimo User

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    Jan 18, 2004
    What kind of scotchbrite would be best? Just looking at the list of scotchbrite products on the 3M website is rather daunting.
     
  2. eclipse trumpets

    eclipse trumpets Piano User

    390
    0
    Oct 24, 2003
    England
    Hi Ash

    The kind of 3M scothcbrite we use is

    CODE NUMBER:- 07903

    TYPE :- A-VFN (stands for very fine)

    It is purple in colour!

    We have found this to be great for going straight onto the brass with while giving a great finish without having to use several grades.

    Hope this helps a little?

    Regards

    Leigh
     
  3. Horn of Praise

    Horn of Praise Pianissimo User

    181
    1
    Nov 1, 2003
    United States
    Hi Leigh,

    It was very nice of you to share this information. When I was at a Chicago area "trumpetfest" about a week and a half ago, I played a wonderful Olds Ambassador that had a do-it-yourself scratch satin finish. The horn's owner said that they used the "green" 3M Scotchbrite available at Wal-Mart. Because it left the finish "scratches" slightly more defined they they had expected, they used #0000 steel wool to "smooth out" the brushed look. The steel wool made it slightly more "satin" in appearance.

    What do you think of "finishing off" with #0000 steel wool?

    Thanks in advance. All the best.
     
  4. JDondero

    JDondero New Friend

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    Nov 15, 2003
    After reading this thread last week, and wishing all my horns had that scratch finish, I decided to try it. I have an old mostly raw brass Getzen cornet that I figured I could afford to mess up, so I gave it a try. The brass was all a very dark brown. Picture the typical horn found in the attic after 40 or 50 years, with some dings and bends. I used the heavy duty scotch brite pads from WalMart. The fine scotch brite pad with sponge on one side did not do the job. I found that as soon as I rubbed it with the scotch brite, it cleaned up to a beautiful scratched brass finish. It took me three evenings to get all the horn I could, and the area around and under the 2nd valve slide is not perfect, but the rest of the horn looks awesome! I may resort to some sort of bead blasting to get the rest. I found that after I got an area polished/scratched, I could easily go back and orient the grain however I wanted. I also tried the fine steel wool - it gave a more satin finish.

    The end result is a horn I'm not embarassed to be seen with. The finish as of today is a mix of scratched and satin, and is beautiful. It unfortunately plays the same however, which is why I felt I could use it as an experiment. I don't think I have the nerve to try this with my good horns, although I would love then all to have this nice of a finish.

    It does work and the results are beautiful - even the nickel reinforcing sleeves cleaned up nice.

    Good luck if you decide to try it!

    John
     
  5. Horn of Praise

    Horn of Praise Pianissimo User

    181
    1
    Nov 1, 2003
    United States
    Hi John,

    Thanks so much for your feedback. I'm glad that the steel wool worked for you.

    Yes, the grain can be re-oriented. I have had the same experience with stainless steel (at work).

    All the best (you brave cornet owner :wink: )
     
  6. JDondero

    JDondero New Friend

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    Nov 15, 2003
    Horn of Praise - I'm just wondering if you took a chance and tried this on a horn yet or not. I'd like to know if your results are as good as I think mine are.

    John
     
  7. Horn of Praise

    Horn of Praise Pianissimo User

    181
    1
    Nov 1, 2003
    United States
    Hi John,

    No, I haven't tried it yet because I'm still looking for a "volunteer" horn. My wife (who is helping me look) almost had one last week. I will probably have better luck this spring when the garage sales "come to life".

    I am really hoping for a Bundy cornet (my first horn in 4th grade). I think it would be "over the top" to have a scratch/satin finish Bundy cornet. Kind of like a $5,000 paint job on a Ford Pinto. :lol:

    Leigh MacKinney sent me some Scotchbrite from England (the same 3M model and spec he uses on his Eclipse horns). The Scotchbrite he sent is purple in color.

    All the best.
     
  8. Brad-K

    Brad-K Piano User

    250
    88
    Jun 18, 2011
    If you're worried about turning a horn into a lamp, try what I've seen recommended elsewhere on this forum, and practice on an actual brass lamp. I've got one in the garage, waiting for me to give it a go.

    I've yet to do an actual horn, but experience from restoring and refinishing stuff since I was a kid, tells me that the tiny nooks and crannies are the place to start, and that the Dremel (carefully applied) is the tool for the job. Then, it's a matter of working outward, matching the larger areas to the smaller.

    Bead-blasting the nooks....I wouldn't do that. You want a consistent finish everywhere.
     
  9. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,393
    7,506
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    DUDE, YOU GONNA RESURRECT EVERY ZOMBIE THREAD OUT THERE?? This ones over 7 years old! ROFLROFLROFLROFL
     
    Vulgano Brother likes this.
  10. xjb0906

    xjb0906 Piano User

    460
    174
    May 2, 2009
    Charlotte NC
    Scotch-Brite These will attach to a drill .
     

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