Bugles?

Discussion in 'Horns' started by Heavens2kadonka, Nov 1, 2004.

  1. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Jun 17, 2004
    Lebanon, TN
    I'm just wondering what kind of bugles are out there worth purchasing, since there is almost no topic out there about it...

    Van
     
  2. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    I think there are only two that are "production line" and those would be Kanstul and Getzen. Bugles aren't really a "demand" item up this way (marching bands are few and far between); and we seem to have accepted trumpets for "Last Post" and "Reveille" performances.
     
  3. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Lebanon, TN
    Yeah, I figured they're a dying breed. The only bugle I've ever seen in person was my old band director's, and he had PAINTED it, for some odd reason. :D

    Thanks for the quick reply, Toots.

    Van
     
  4. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    Some formal military outfits still use them, I believe, and then there's the Aggie Band, which has 12 game bugles (meaning they are FLAWLESS), and 12 practice bugles (which aren't as nice, but are still in good shape because touching the bugle is a kiss of death if you're not on bugle rank). I don't know what brand, or if they even play.
     
  5. MUSICandCHARACTER

    MUSICandCHARACTER Forte User

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    Jan 31, 2004
    Newburgh, Indiana
    Bugle has changed in definition too.

    Is a bugle a valveless instrument?

    Drum and Bugle Corps until 2000 used G bugles with two or three valves. They now use Bb/F instruments (trumpets, mellophones, baritones, euphoniums, and BBb tubas). They, of course, still call them bugles for the most part, sop, mello or alto, tenor, contra.

    Some drum and bugle corps still march with G horns ... but they are becoming few and far between -- the Bb/F instruments have a much higher resale value -- especially to marching bands. So as the corps by new horns, the tend to go with Bb/F.

    A no valve bugle is becoming a rare thing.
     
  6. davyar

    davyar New Friend

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    Nov 2, 2004
    Belleville, Illinois
    I bought a very used Olds G bugle at an antique show. I has one valve (whole steps) and one rotary valve (half steps). It's fun to play bugle calls. My daughter likes to play it, too. I'll get it overhauled someday and display it in my family room.

    Dave
    Belleville, IL
     
  7. alanbach

    alanbach Pianissimo User

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    Dec 10, 2003
    South Wales U.K.
    I've got three bugles decorating my fireplace...strategically placed of course. One of which belonged to an old Indian regiment attached to the British Army during WWII. I'd love to get my hands on a Royal Marines silver plated bugle though. They are used on Armistice parade at the cenotaph in London when six of the Royal Marines play the Last Post in unison.
     
  8. Kanstulbrass

    Kanstulbrass Pianissimo User

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    Anaheim, CA
    Bugles - Military or Pageantry?

    Kanstul proudly makes bugles, both the Military-style non-valved horns and bugles in the key of G for drum and bugle corps.
     
  9. regularsopguy

    regularsopguy New Friend

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    Feb 16, 2004
    Does anyone know how much the Getzen field trumpet is? I'm looking at that or the Kanstul bugle which runs $190 in silver.
     

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