bugles

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by christineka, Nov 21, 2014.

  1. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    What mouthpiece are you using with the Rexcraft?
     
  2. christineka

    christineka Pianissimo User

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    Trumpet. The rexcraft mouthpiece gives it a very airy tone.
     
  3. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    These are the 2 I'd consider. The Getzen and Kanstul are well-made, in-tune, and worth the money.

    I have a Getzen Field Trumpet in Bb. It includes a G slide.

    Mike
     
  4. christineka

    christineka Pianissimo User

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    At the risk of embarrassing myself, because you will now know exactly how bad I am at playing, here's a video, which illustrates my problem with that low note. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9tCQCeFg9A

    (I'm currently working on a project. I'm memorizing all 15 bugle calls required for the bugling merit badge and videoing them. I have 4 left.)
     
  5. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I think this is a G bugle. If so, the low note your trying to play is a low concert G. Correct?

    My son used a cheap eBay/Asian bugle to take camping in the Boy Scouts. It was also in G, and the low G and high G were both flat.
     
  6. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Christine, I'm off work today, so I dug out some field trumpets, a bugle, and a bunch of mouthpieces. I have a Rexcraft "U.S. Regulation" field trumpet, and it has exactly the same problem as yours. I tried various trumpet mouthpieces, a flugelhorn mouthpiece, and the crummy mouthpiece that comes with them, and that low note doesn't exist on that horn, no matter which mouthpiece is used.

    I then tried the Kanstul field trumpet and the low note is in tune and clear as a bell. I also have one of those copper "Gunga Din" copies of a British bugle, and even it will play the low note fairly well. I suppose there's no fixing the Rexcraft, so your only alternatives are to play that call on a trumpet (or cornet or whatever), or buy a better field trumpet.

    Well, there is one more option... You could buy one of those cheap Gunga Din bugles, stick a trumpet mouthpiece in it, and make do that way.
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    My current U.S. Regulation bugle was marketed by Slingerland (once a renown drum maker) and made by Holton. Rexcraft is also only a marketer, but who the manufacture is / was of theirs is unknown. Still, the brass Boy Scout one I once had as a Boy Scout 66 years ago, and it was a hand me down from my late brother, served me well enough to earn the bugling merit badge which by that time I had studied the trumpet for 5 years. For a time during WWII, the Boy Scouts also marketed a plastic bugle, which I have also played ... but never sounded like a good brass one. I too have a Brit copy made in India and another Brit as may be authentic and certainly is at least a 1/3 heavier than the Indian one.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Actually for not too much money you can fix the bugle. It would require a tech to cut off a section of pipe from the mouthpiece on and replace it with a real trumpet leadpipe. The response and intonation would improve greatly! Even if the tech took the leadpipe from a beater horn, it would most likely be fine. Those intonation issues are always on the first 12" of pipe or so.
     
  9. christineka

    christineka Pianissimo User

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    Thank you! I am glad it's not just me.

    Is this a viable solution? Would adding a trumpet lead pipe give me that note? If so, I will look into it as a possibility.
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    On my baroque trumpets the leadpipe IS the difference between the note being there or not. It is the same issue even with trumpets -regardless of pitch, when the intonation sucks, the mouthpiece/leadpipe combo is always the problem.

    The trumpet mouthpiece with a C cup is not as easy for petal tones as a more vee shaped cup.
     

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