Bulging cervical (neck) disc

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by berner218, Sep 4, 2010.

  1. berner218

    berner218 New Friend

    1
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    Sep 4, 2010
    Baltimore, MD
    I've just been diagnosed with a bulging C6-C7 disc in my neck and was told not to play for at least 4 weeks during treatment (drugs for pain, disc decompression traction and chiropractic adjustments). Since none of my doctors are musicians and have no idea about what I can expect after the 4 weeks has been completed, I was wondering if anyone out there had experienced the same thing and can clue me in on what to expect. I currently play lead/split lead in 4 different groups and am concerned about high register compression. Any input is welcome.
    Thanx
     
  2. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    May 11, 2009
    Yorba Linda, CA
    I think it has a lot to do with how you play. That is, does your playing put pressure on the cervical discs or cause pain?

    I had spinal decompression (22 sessions) on my lower back (herniated L3/L4, bulging L4/L5) and I found that I could do anything during that period that did not cause pain (basketball was out but playing trumpet was OK). Has the chiropractor attempted to examine how your playing style would cause any effects on your neck? For example, do you play with your head tilted back?

    Since mine was lower back and not neck, it is not exactly comparable but I think your situation would warrant some degree of investigation about what exactly could cause any problem.
     
  3. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    I've just been diagnosed with a bulging C6-C7 disc in my neck and was told not to play for at least 4 weeks during treatment (drugs for pain, disc decompression traction and chiropractic adjustments).
    ------
    Advice: Don't play.
     
  4. forrest

    forrest Piano User

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    Aug 14, 2007
    St Louis MO
    I had that same disk replaced 4 years ago. Surgeon told me not to play for 4 weeks after surgery then to ease back in to it.

    Not an ounce of pain after the surgery, to this day.

    Get a good surgeon and don't bother with drugs - get it replaced and you'll be better off is my opinion.
     
  5. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    May 11, 2009
    Yorba Linda, CA
    I don't want to start a war here, but this issue is too important - even more important than embouchure development - to take one person's viewpoint. That is why I suggested that you have the medical professionals that you consult try to identify the real issues with your neck vis-a-vis playing or not.

    I know at least 20 (more if I think about it for awhile) family or friends who have had back/neck problems. They fall into two camps: those who had surgery and those who did not - let's say 10 on each side. Of the 10 who had surgery, 1 is pain free and the other 9 are anywhere from highly to marginally functional and none are pain free. Of the 10 who did not have surgery, at least 5 are pain free and the other five are moderately to highly functional.

    So, Forrest is the one in 20 who had surgery and is pain free. Those are not great odds in my book. When I had the herniated and bulging discs, I looked at surgery and was told by no fewer than 3 neuro/orthopedic surgeons that there was absolutely no-way, no-how that I could ever consider going on a basketball court again. I elected for spinal decompression with the idea that if it failed, surgery was still an option. That was 3 years ago and I still play basketball 3 times per week, am completely pain free, take no drugs or pain medication, and am functional in (most) other ways.

    My view is that surgery is the absolute last resort. If that fails, there is no solution past that point.

    Just my take on the matter.
     
  6. forrest

    forrest Piano User

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    Aug 14, 2007
    St Louis MO
    My opinion is just that - my opinion. It's based on my experiences and I realize others may have different experiences and opinions.

    The one that really counts is the doctor's opinion. And I mean neurosurgeon, not a chiropractor.

    Peace.
     

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