Buying a Used Stomvi Trumpet - What do I need to Know?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by nebrsmithers, May 15, 2010.

  1. nebrsmithers

    nebrsmithers New Friend

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    May 14, 2010
    Hello All,

    I have enjoyed the last couple of days, watching and reading from the sidelines. But I have not had much luck finding the answers to some specific questions and this purchase is time senitive. So here goes:

    1. Does the age of the Trumpet matter? The owner got it second hand and has no idea of the age. I took it to a local brass repair & restoration shop and while the person was very helpful he could not determin its age. The serial # is 0220026 if anyone can help.

    2. This is a Stromvi Forte which I understand is a higher end student model, but I am buying it for a beginner. She has an established musical background with 5 years already devoted to the piano. Still is this too much trumpet for a 11 year old?

    3. What is a fair price for the instrument? They are asking $850. The horn is in good condition with no dents or scratches. Just needs a good cleaning and polish to look new again.

    4. How should the cleaning be handled? I have read it all on the Internet, from Acid wash, Bath tub & dish soap, to Zachary's music DON"T CLEAN IT EVER! Looking into the slides there is a bit of build up, not much, but before I put it into my daughters hands I would like to clean it. The Brass Repair store will sonic clean and hand polish for $150. That includes aligning the valve's and replacement of minor valve parts.

    5. What do I need to know before purchasing this instrument? I have no musical background and have no idea what to look for in a used instrument. I figure if I am going to spend that much on a rental over the next 12 to 24 months I am better off buying a nicer insturment for the same price.

    Please help! The more I read on the Internet the more confused I get. Thanks!
     
  2. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

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    Dec 5, 2008
    I just gave 70 USD for 1952 Holton Collegiate Cornet, no issues, one small dent and half of the lacquier fell. So think over the price again. If its for begginer stay in the 200USD range. Huh for 850USD you can get brand new pretty decent horn like Jupiter maybe even some cheaper model of Yamaha. 850 Bucks is fine budget think it over few times.
     
  3. ExtraTeeth

    ExtraTeeth Pianissimo User

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    Nov 13, 2008
    Perth, Western Australia
    I have been playing a Stomvi Forte for the last 5 years. This is a very, very good trumpet that is capable of playing way beyond the 'student' category. I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it for a beginner with a serious interest in music (as opposed to the kid who has music tuition imposed on them because its 'good for them' - a bit like broccoli).
    The Forte is the easiest playing trumpet I've ever had. My band buddy on 2nd in the concert band (a fellow with some 40 years experience) was so impressed, he bought one too.
    The serial number is a bit of a puzzle as mine is only 5 digit.
    A sonic clean is probably a good idea. I don't see why valve parts should need replacing if its been looked after and a valve alignment job shouldn't be necessary.
    $850 seems a little expensive. Shop around and you could buy new for around $1200.
    For comparison, the other candidates on my shortlist when I bought were the Yamaha 4335 and the Kanstul 700.
     
  4. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    May 11, 2009
    Yorba Linda, CA
    Hi, nebrsmithers, welcome to Trumpetmaster. I hope that some of the responses will be of benefit to you and your young musician.

    In general the age does not matter. But, for some brands, the ownership changed over the years and the newer models did not match the earlier quality. Stomvi is not one of those. Playability will be a function of the care it has received.

    This is a much-debated issue. Of course, early-on, she will not appreciate or benefit much from the difference between any two good trumpets (Asian imports not included.) But, if she continues to progress, she will increasingly come to appreciate a quality instrument. The question is simply whether she will continue and whether you need to spend a lot to find out.

    I am not an expert on Stomvi - I will defer to others on whether this is a deal or not. The question really is whether you have access to anything better for that price or equal for a lower price.

    Bath tub (lukewarm only) and dish soap - with a good snake brush - is the best starting point, with some mild wax to protect the lacquer. Then see how it plays. It may not need the valve alignment (what you described does not sound like a real alignment - just replacement of the felts and corks to ensure the valves sit at the right height). You can do more later if it seems warranted.

    Well, this is sort of a loaded question. I'm not sure anyone really knows all that they need to know - or what you need to know. A lot depends on whether the Stomvi is a rush deal or whether you have time to become a bit more educated. Yes, the internet can become very confusing. If there is a store nearby, take the 11-year old there and look at different models and try them out and ask the rep (hopefully someone who is engaged and knowledgeable) for some insights.

    In the end, there are thousands of models of trumpets - new and old - and all are different and are perceived differently by each player. It is impossible to know them all. Simply find something that works and go from there. The rest will take a lifetime.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2010
  5. nebrsmithers

    nebrsmithers New Friend

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    May 14, 2010
    Thanks for all the responses. They have all been helpful. In my quest for information I have realized that Stomvi makes instruments in Spain and the USA. This trumpet is stamped Valenica, Spain. That could make a difference in the serial numbers being different lengths.
     
  6. nebrsmithers

    nebrsmithers New Friend

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    May 14, 2010
    This horn is silver plate. does it have the same lacquer finish that a brass horn does?
     
  7. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    May 11, 2009
    Yorba Linda, CA
    No, but the same cleaning methods apply. Then wipe it clean with a soft cloth after each playing session to keep it shiny. Because it does not have lacquer, it will start to tarnish after awhile. there are many threads here about how to remove tarnish with hot water, salt, and aluminum foil. It's pretty easy.
     

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