buying Lacquer

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by RAK, Aug 21, 2009.

  1. RAK

    RAK Piano User

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    Jul 23, 2009
    Kettle Falls, Washington
  2. knotty

    knotty New Friend

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    Jun 8, 2009
    San Francisco, Ca.
    I'm no expert by any means and have never lacquered a instrument but have sprayed cars. I imagine you need a spray booth and a good quality touch up spray gun (small) with a compressor that supplies filtered air with moisture trap. Most of all a way of holding the instrument while you spray it.

    But I could be totally wrong.
     
  3. RAK

    RAK Piano User

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    Jul 23, 2009
    Kettle Falls, Washington
    you are 100% right. Yeah the guns I have are for cars. I personally never painted a car but seen family members do it. I have a small gun that's good. It's bigger than an air brush gun. On the videos I watched the worker was holding the trumpet with one hand(he had gloves on) and spraying with other hand. I think I could get a spray booth. I think maybe an old trumpet stand would work. I just don't have an old one. Maybe I could make one of foam and wood.
     
  4. knotty

    knotty New Friend

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    Jun 8, 2009
    San Francisco, Ca.
    I was re-thinking this and perhaps a airbrush may be the way to go for something as small as a trumpet. And the equipment cost would be a lot less too. Perhaps one of those car acrylic lacquers?

    For the stand, perhaps a lazy susan setup that you can turn around as you spray. I guess they hold it by something in the bell.
     
  5. RAK

    RAK Piano User

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    Jul 23, 2009
    Kettle Falls, Washington
    I think both guns will work. The airbrush for the small tubing that is hard to reach. I was also thinking about the car lacquers but I was thinking Maybe if I buy lacquers designed for brass instruments It would look nicer. The stand is a very good idea. I'll figure something out as a stand.
     
  6. RAK

    RAK Piano User

    388
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    Jul 23, 2009
    Kettle Falls, Washington
  7. knotty

    knotty New Friend

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    Jun 8, 2009
    San Francisco, Ca.
    Interesting, the spraygun looks like a low velocity touch up size gun used for cars. I'm surprised they don't require him to wear a respirator. Doesn't look too hard once you get the hang of it, I wonder what the lacquer mix is?

    How much does a pro place charge if you brought the horn in paint ready?
     
  8. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Nov 8, 2006
    Greenfield WI
    When I had a trumpet stripped and relacquered by Charlie Melk, that portion of the work was $275.

    Your quote might be different.

    Tom
     
  9. RAK

    RAK Piano User

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    Jul 23, 2009
    Kettle Falls, Washington
    yamaha has a special room that has lacquer everywhere in the air. The put the trumpets in and send electricity through the horns and the lacquer sticks to them.
     
  10. vntgbrslvr

    vntgbrslvr Piano User

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    Oct 10, 2008
    Waukesha, Wisconsin
    I believe your talking about a powder coat system RAK, not lacquer. That is typically done with an electrical current creating a negative charge so the powder sticks to the base metal...then baked where it melts and cures to a glossy hard finish. Lacquer is typically a wet application...powder is a dry application with a post bake/cure. I was not aware that anyone was powder coating their horns...Do you happen to have a video on this as well???
     

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