buying Lacquer

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by RAK, Aug 21, 2009.

  1. RAK

    RAK Piano User

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    Jul 23, 2009
    Kettle Falls, Washington
    thanks for the reply dhbailey. you gave me some useful information. I understand about the unlacqered brass. I have a baritone that's unlacqered. I polish it with acetone sometimes. I wont try lacquering my horns, I'll try it on some brass and metal first to see how it works. If I dont like it I'll give it to the shop.

    I cant find the Nikolas lacquer on ferree's tools. Is there a search on his site? If not what is the link for the lacquer?
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2009
  2. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Jul 28, 2009
    New Hampshire
    You need to click on the 2008 Catalog link, and then click on the Pages 113-167 section and when the PDF file opens up, go to page 42 (of that file) and that's where the lacquering tools and supplies begin. Look through that and the following pages and you'll see what they have to offer. Some terrific things.

    They're still working on putting the entire catalog on-line.
     
  3. RAK

    RAK Piano User

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    Jul 23, 2009
    Kettle Falls, Washington
    Another question:

    Acetone and paint thinner removes paint. Would it remove old lacquer and paint form brass?

    Here are some pictures of the guns I got.

    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]
     
  4. mike ansberry

    mike ansberry Forte User

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    Dec 30, 2003
    Clarksville, Tennessee, U
    I like to use a table leg in the bell to hold a trumpet while I lacquer it. If you want a scratch finish like in the picture, you have to do it to the metal and then lacquer over it. Places like Eclipse use ScotchBrite pads I think. It isn't like painting a car. With a car you do lots of light coats and rub it out. With a horn you have to get a "wet" coat. It is hard to do without getting runs. It takes some practice and a feel for what you are doing. I've been able to get good results with Nikolas lacquer in a spray can. I think it came from Ferrees, but it might have been Eric Brand. I have an old Leblanc Paris model (looks like a Selmer K-Modified) that lacquered with a spray can 30 years ago. It still looks great, except where the lacquer wore off from my hands. But even the baked on epoxy probably would have worn there by now.
     
  5. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Oct 18, 2007
    The Wide Brown Land
    You can get Scothbrite pads and:
    i. cut them into rough squares 2" x 2" (50mm x 50mm),
    ii. make a Scotchbrite square sandwich,
    iii. offset alternate Scotchbrite squares 45 deg,
    iv. bang a 3/16" bolt through the middle of the square with a couple of
    penny washers either side,
    v. run a nut down to squash it all together, and
    vi. stick it in your power drill.

    - works a treat (although I would use white Scotchbrite pads rather than the green ones. The Grades go (I think) blue, green, red (maroon), and then white in descending order of agressiveness.

    The aviation industry uses Scotchbrite pads to polish corrosion out of aluminium - and some of these Scotchbrite wheels (pads) may be available through blacksmiths suppliers.
     
  6. RAK

    RAK Piano User

    388
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    Jul 23, 2009
    Kettle Falls, Washington
    I took a little but of acetone-A flammable substance similar to gasoline and when I rubbed the acetone on the trumpet that lacquer came off. Should I use this to take the rest of lacquer off?
     
  7. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

    493
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    Jul 28, 2009
    New Hampshire
    As long as you don't smoke at the same time you should be fine.:-)

    You won't hurt the brass with that stuff -- you just might want to keep it away from any mother-of-pearl in your finger buttons, and use it in a well-ventilated area because those fumes are dangerous.
     
  8. RAK

    RAK Piano User

    388
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    Jul 23, 2009
    Kettle Falls, Washington
    Yes I understand. I used rubber gloves because the stuff gets into your skin.
    I should wear a mask.

    :thumbsup:
     
  9. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    The Wide Brown Land
    RAK, your personal proctective equipment (PPE) is important - use the appropriate mask - not just any old one. Interestingly acetone is the base ingredient (along with castor oil and colouring) of nail polish remover. So lots of girls get it on their fingers.
     

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