C Trumpet Project

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Derrick, Apr 28, 2013.

  1. Derrick

    Derrick New Friend

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    Apr 4, 2013
    You bring a great deal of very useful information to the table! I actually did not know what solder was used for the connection areas(i.e, valve casing soldering). And I had not really put much thought into how to hold the instrument when making cuts on the instrument itself(rather than the tuning slide, which is quite easy) Thanks you for the advice!
     
  2. Derrick

    Derrick New Friend

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    Apr 4, 2013
    This makes sense. I have a bit of room for error on the main tuning slide, but not on the others. Thank you for the response!
     
  3. dangeorges

    dangeorges Pianissimo User

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    Oct 20, 2010

    When I read, "I've got a mini-pipe cutter and a very small and thin "hacksaw"" I shuddered!

    If you convert the Bb to a C, I don't think it's a horn you will want to play out with, especially with other folks who are using C trumpets.

    However, if this is more of an investigative process and more for your own pleasure, it sounds like you're on the right track - especially with the intonation problems you will encounter (not to mention the potential for leaks when soldering).

    I've never done something like this before, so I can't comment on how to do it, but I can tell you it's possible.

    Have fun and good luck!
     
  4. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Jul 14, 2010
    Yeah but who else has a decent C trumpet? :dontknow: As far as I can tell there aren't many for an intermediate amateurs, because they never have made student C horns.
     
  5. Masterwannabe

    Masterwannabe Mezzo Piano User

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    Sep 11, 2009
    Colorado
    This is exactly one of the reasons i have been working on this kind of project. There are tons of cheap C horns on the market and I think an aspiring player should have the opportunity to experiment without spending thousands of dollars. I have heard/read many comments on TM expounding the fact that a cheap student horn would do more harm in the learning process than anything else. It is more than possible to make a good to excellent C horn from a Bb if you start from a decent point and of course learn the skills necessary. I don't claim to be an expert but I get better with each one (practice makes perfect). I have had several of my horns evaluated by a tech who is, I think one of the best ( was offered a job building trumpets for Monette but circumstances just didn't jive at the time), and he said they were good intermediate horns. I know that they probably would not meet his standards but I find a lot of things that don't meet them, he is a perfectionist. One of the tings that I have a problem is finding a decent horn to work from and not pay an arm & leg for it because i guess too many people have reservations about the conversions. What more is a C conversion than the same materials a Bb horn is built from, the correct measurements and the proper skills to assemble it?

    Ray Z :dontknow::play::dontknow::play::dontknow::play:
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  6. dangeorges

    dangeorges Pianissimo User

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    Oct 20, 2010
    What about a nice used horn?

    I've been contemplating purchasing a C trumpet, but because I get along fine by transposing, and because I rarely (if ever) play alongside of someone who uses a C, I've held off.

    How about this one on eBay?
    Getzen C Trumpet with EXTRAS | eBay
     
  7. Masterwannabe

    Masterwannabe Mezzo Piano User

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    Sep 11, 2009
    Colorado
    I would think a good used horn is a great alternative, when I mentioned 'cheap' C trumpets I was specifically referring to most of the Chinese & Tristar horns. It would do no good to take a Tristar Bb and convert to a C horn because you are starting from a sub-standard point. My current project is an Olds Ambassador (not professional but not sub-standard). The Getzen Eterna you referenced is a great horn.

    Ray Z :play:
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    If you don't know where you are going it doesn't matter how you get there.
     
  8. dangeorges

    dangeorges Pianissimo User

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    Oct 20, 2010
    The Eterna really looks like a great buy. I may bid (and snag) on it myself - if the price stays low.
    For $500 you can't go wrong on a pro C trumpet (if you're looking).
     
  9. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Jul 14, 2010

    I have also seen interesting frankenhorn D/C conversions on ebay that go for more than that, so it must be a deal.
     
  10. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    South Salem, NY
    As a person who does this stuff for a living, I would say that you have left out the most important part: the design and concept. Anyone can work out the dimensions, just play around with the twelfth root of two. And anyone can learn and hone a decent soldering technique - and by the way, you will NEVER need to silver solder in your conversion, all your joints should be soft soldered. If you do not get the concept right, you will be using an awful lot of long fingerings: C - 2+3, E 1+2, etc.
     

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