Calling all female trumpet players out there!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetgirl13, Oct 18, 2010.

  1. cloudnine

    cloudnine Pianissimo User

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    My girlfriend's a trumpet player.

    We both live in Toronto and go to school (she's at U of T, I'm at York).
     
  2. Buck with a Bach

    Buck with a Bach Fortissimo User

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    Lynn Erickson comes to mind. that SSB duet with Manny still brings chills when I bring it back up................Buck:oops:
     
  3. Gliss Girl

    Gliss Girl Pianissimo User

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    Aug 31, 2009
    Portland, MI
    I play in a four-person community band trumpet section. The section leader and I are women. One of the two men played as a top-flight professional, and although he is clearly much better than the rest of us, and existed for years as a professional in a men's-only world of touring bands, he is a complete gentleman and absolutely does not seek the spotlight. The second man is a dear 86-year-old who plays in three bands, and his adoring wife goes with him to every performance. Men who treat their wives so well seem to treat other women well too and this man is no exception. Actually, he inspires a female tendency in me to care for him as a grandfatherly figure. I came to the trumpet a couple of years ago as a 44-year-old. I had been a French Horn player in high school - an instrument that is probably equally played by men and women; so I had no expectation as an adult player on a male dominated instrument that I ought to be treated differently. If anything, I think I may receive favorable treatment from these great guys who believe in ladies first. I like it! I may not have had such help and encouragement if I was a guy. I think the key is, being a woman, to play with confidence - as Flugle Girl mentioned in her post already. Sex doesn't matter as long as one plays well and shows she cares about the music and contributing to the section.
     
  4. melza

    melza Pianissimo User

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    I havent experienced any problems or people judging me different because Im a female trumpet player. Im glad you didnt let them stop you playing.
     
  5. Dave Mickley

    Dave Mickley Forte User

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    my wife is a very good trumpet player and had to put up with the "trumpet is a male instrument" all through high school. She would win her challenges and then the band director would over rule the decision. she was instructed to help the section leader with the solos because he couldn't get them right until she worked with him. Her private teacher [ a very well thought of symphony player here in Indy at the time] pleaded with her not to challenge the section leader [another one of his students] because he was a year older and her time would come after he graduated. She was playing Arban's "The Carnival of Venice" as a freshman and really enjoyed playing a lot of different Clark's solos [very good technically]. Her father even missed work one day to ask the band director if there was something she did to deserve the treatment she was getting from the other players [name calling and such] but he refused to meet with him. This all happened in the middle 70s and hopefully the girls of today don't have to go through what she went through. She still gets that treatment now and then and that is why she will never get involved in another band.
     
  6. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Trumpetgirl,

    Sorry to hear about your bad experiences. The bands I was in during HS were outside the school system, I missed that whole school music experience. Probably for that reason, I've rarely seen anyone being treated as a 2nd rate musician, but I've mostly been in the pop/rock/r&b world. I started playing drums in HS because one of my best friends back then, Heidi Hansen, played them. She encouraged me to get my first drum set.

    Now, I take lessons from the trumpet professor at the local University. His student before me is a college girl (she sounds very good) and the one after me is a younger girl in middle school. He's a popular teacher, very easy going, funny and kind. When I sit and wait outside his office, I can hear him giving instructions and joking and laughing with them just like he does with me. Sorry that you didn't have a teacher like this early. He's very proud of his daughter, who is a French Horn player and he hosted an event at his house where 30 FH players assembeled together to play (can you imagine??). We need more teachers like this.

    Turtle
     
  7. Cloud_Strife

    Cloud_Strife New Friend

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    Oct 7, 2010
    When I played for concert band in 6th grade, none of the boys had a problem with me being the only girl trumpet. Most of the time they were trying to flirt with me.

    But in my freshman year, in all 10 trumpets and I was still the only girl. Out of all of them, 3 didnt like me, they didnt really take me seriously and they basically dashed my confidence for that year. But at the end of my freshman year, when I had joined jazz band, 1 of them came to respect me cause he heard me doing a solo and finally realized that I was just as good as the other trumpets. But I still admired Justin for being an amazing trumpet player. Hope he goes far in life.
     
  8. gglassmeyer

    gglassmeyer Piano User

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    Cincinnati, OH
    I attended an all male catholic high school so all instruments were male only. We had a sister school nearby that was falling on financial difficulties. As I was graduating, my school had agreed to go co-ed. The year after my graduation would continue to be all male while they prepared the school to become co-ed. Our band director enthusiastically embraced this coming change and asked if girls who were interested could join in the band in this interim year. They were allowed and 3 young ladies joined the band. I got to meet them over the summer after my graduation as recent alums were invited back to play performances. One of the 3 was a trumpet player. These young ladies were treated very well.

    The band was preparing for a summer trip to a band competition and I was planning to go on the trip with my parents to watch my younger brother perform. My brother came home and told me that they were mistakenly entered to compete against 18-21 year old bands and said that I could march with them if I wanted. This young lady that I had met as she was a freshman was now a senior and trumpet section leader. In fact the top 3 trumpet players were all young women. I found that they were much more disciplined and mature than the male players and were fine players. I know that one of them went on to become a band director and another one became that school's trumpet instructor. I think that the director created an environment where the you women could flourish and deserves a lot of credit. It seems like some directors may foster the exact opposite and allow / possibly encourage harassment situations. In my company, people would face harsh disciplinary action for sexual harassment. It should be no different for teachers or students. That kind of harassment should never be tollerated. If you put yourself in the other person's shoes, common sense would show that it is hurtful and just plain wrong.
    My 3 daughters are never told they can't do something because they're girls. And while they do like to play with dolls and makeup and other stereotypical girl activities, they also like to work with tools, play with fire while camping, and God help a boy who tries to challenge Abby in soccer.
    I hope none of them have to endure this kind of harassment in the future.

    For those of you who have had to, know that there are many more bands out there and in most of them gender has no bearing on a player's worth to the group. Players are always welcome.
     
  9. Fluffy615

    Fluffy615 Piano User

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    I'm an elementary school instrumental music teacher. Before that I was a high school band director. I always teach my students that instruments don't have a gender. There are no boy/girl instruments.
    Bob
     
  10. trumpetgirl13

    trumpetgirl13 New Friend

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    Hamilton
    Thanks everyone for your responses.... I wish I had teh strangth back in college to stand up for myself...

    when I went to the head of our department thats when I was told "that's the way it is in the industry so get used to it", I should have gone higher to the dean but like i said I wasn't the strongest at that point of my life... If I had the confidence I have now my mentality would be to prove them wrong..

    I do remember my last year, I was in this group called the small big band and the teacher that directed us in this was one of the teachers that wouldn't ever even give me a chance. Well this arrangement was given to us and the lead trumpet part was for a loud and high player (which I am, but they didn't know that), the teacher didn't want to give me the part, I faught him for it, told him to finally give me a chance (as I had been there 3 years already). So he gave me the part to "try", first time we played it, I didn't miss a note and I ROCKED it... Needless to say I shocked my teacher, and the rest of the school when it came time to perform it in front of everyone... It literally took until year 3 for anyone to really hear me play lead or solos.

    My public and high school teachers were wonderful!!!!!!!!!! Unfortunatley I didn't bring that confidence to college with me......
     

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