Can anyone play high?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by john7401, Dec 30, 2010.

  1. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Then you should play a Tuba! ;-):lol:
     
  2. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    7 octaves? :shock: Does that include pedal tones?

    By comparison, the saxophone has ...... 3? Or 4?

    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2010
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Most definitely includes pedals (C1-F2). Bite the reed an you get at least another 2 octaves :lol:!
     
  4. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    -----
    Sometimes a simple question generates other questions that need answered in order to answer the original question:
    What is "Proper work"?
    What is "Proper effort"?
    How long is the "Effort"?
    How high is "High"?
    What is "Why"?
    --
    Let's get to the meat.
    What are you doing to increase your range?
    How long have you been doing it?
    What is your current range?
    How long have you been playing?
     
  5. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    I can't think of any other musical instrument in which getting range is more difficult. Take the saxophone (please!) .... it has an octave key. The piano ... you just lean more to your right.:dontknow:

    Trumpet is tough. Range is another area where a good teacher can make the critical difference.

    Turtle
     
  6. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    As others pointed out, the definition of "high" is somewhat variable. But I say that the answer is no.

    I used to be a runner back in high school (although not a good one). But anyone can be a runner. And just about any healthy person can complete a 5k race. But not everyone can be a competitive runner or a world class runner. In the same way, just about anyone can play the trumpet. But not everyone can master the instrument (whether we're talking about "playing high" or other aspects).

    It's an interesting question. But for me personally, it doesn't matter. I know I have limitations. But I love playing the trumpet, and I'm doing what I can to be a better player.

    Mike
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Once upon a time I could hit and hold a double high C and with some help from higher powers above this earth there is still potential for me to do it again although presently I can't play anything. Still, approximately 90+% of all my music would not require such and I'd be happy as a lark if it were otherwise and I could hold and play the position of 4th chair solid on any brass instrument now. On my agenda today is a bath a re-lube of my mellophone (F). Yes, I schedule all my instruments for such on a monthly basis thus when the Docs and Dentist say I can all I need to do is pick them up and play. Well, we all know it won't be that simple for I shall have to reset my embouchure and aperture, but through some exercises I believe I've kept my lip muscles in fair shape and found I can actually lip buzz a few simple songs and scare the heck out of my wife with a fog horn blow on my conch ... and I'm attempting to grind another conch that will play the same (or better) as the one I inherited.
     
  8. john7401

    john7401 Pianissimo User

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    I really left it vague intentionally to see what comes up.

    Things I've tried to help range: more practice, less practice, taking a while off practicing + building up slowly, various lip slurs, various amounts of lip slurs, breathing exercises, picked up jogging for a time, the pencil exercise, focussing on tongue movement (Taw-Eee), endurance exercises, focussing on just my normal register for practice, focussing on just my higher register for practice, pedal tones/pedal exercises, long tones, doing all practice quiet, doing just portions of practice quiet, lip buzzing, heavy day/light day practice, (Picked up "rest as much as you play concept"), worked with air speed / amount of air on higher notes, worked on obtaining a better mental approach to higher notes, tried visualizing aids for playing higher (ex: the air hitting a chiar, then wall, then ect. or ball rolling out of the bell so far or even the "ray of power" idea I found here).

    Honestly though, some of those attempted aids probably have not been used the proper amount of time for results. (Ex: pencil exercise i used every other day for only about 2 weeks I think before I gave it up?) However, things such as the quiet practice technique I used for multiple months, I still do breathing daily, the jogging phase was at least a couple months before that died off, lip buzzing (free buzz/mpc buzz) probably about a month, rest as much as played concept has been in effect for maybe a year + 1/2 to 2, lips slurs/variations/varied amounts for at least a year and a half...

    And have been working with a teacher for 2 years now. He is completely confused as to why he cannot get me there. I fail to see it at times, but he really is a great teacher and knows what he is doing.

    No strange physical things going on here, no funky embochure or mouthpiece placement.

    Yet, my current range only lasts up to the G sitting on the top of the staff after now 5 and 1/2 years. Good tone and everything too. Was having struggles with endurance last year, and still am, but that has gotten lots better. Since 2 years ago, the only improvement I have seen in range is me getting an A every now and then and a somewhat louder/more reliable G.

    Now I'm trying a P.E.T.E. to see if it helps. Might as well give it its chance after going through everything else.

    Im not sure how anyone could have any advice to offer after reading that :/ So, I just wanted to know how many people really thought anyone could gain a high range. Probably just for hope, because I'm pretty well exhausted of that right about now.
     
  9. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    OK, try this:
    Get on Youtube and watch Maynard. Listen (Listen deeply, study the sound) to as much Maynard as you can on the ipod.
    Get some tunes like Oye Como Va and work on taking it up an octave. Practice your scales in two octaves (all twelve) Study Maynard's posture, the way he prepares to play a note.
    Read Arch Tongue and Hiss.
    Hope this helps
     
  10. john7401

    john7401 Pianissimo User

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    I will. Thank you.
     

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