Can anyone play high?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by john7401, Dec 30, 2010.

  1. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    you see the problem with this logic is that for most of my 25 years of trumpet playing -- before this comeback. I too was "programmed" to believe that DHC was totally out of reach.

    I was taught to believe that high notes (above high C) were virtually impossible to the most average player - like me.

    I've worked very hard for 2 years now -- and I say High notes up to DHC are available to everyone with normal abilities --dedication, discipline, and working beyong what you believe you can be.

    but that is just my opinion.
     
  2. fraserhutch

    fraserhutch Mezzo Piano User

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    Count me in here. In fact, I didn't believe I could play up there first, my teacher at the time, Greg Lyons told me he'd have me playing there long before I believed him.

    I was a CG guy all through college. I had a great solid performance range from low F# to F above high C. But I always really believed that the altissimo range belonged to a select few. And I believed it all through my playing career.

    This all changed just a couple of years ago, when Greg changed the way I see the horn. Now I play good double Cs every day. I do this so my Gs and As are totally dependable, because, like Al, I get those in lead charts all the time. the difference is, now I can play them, which I never thought I could do when I actually made a living at this.

    Now I just fight the bad habits which creep back in when I don't get to play much. As mentioned, it takes a while to reprogram your brain, but it can be done if you want it enough.

    Most importantly, is that Greg fixed an embouchure issue I had, and now I am just a better player all around. It took a while, but I think this also has a lot to do with the secure range.


     
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I'll make it three in a row :lol:, even though I already said yes earlier. It's a traditional mindset that says you can't do it. Not the mindset one should look for in a teacher. Can anyone play a DHC? With the proper instruction and dedication to practice, yes. Will you sound like Maynard? NO! Just because one hasn't gotten there doesn't mean one can't. Dedication to practice and proper instruction and you can get there. In weeks? NO! It will take several years and that's the rub for most players. It's not like learning scales. It will take longer.:thumbsup:
     
  4. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I appreciate what kingtrumpet and EdMann are saying. And of course, we're all just giving our opinions on this.

    But let me clarify that I'm not saying students should be "programmed" to believe the DHC is out of reach. We all should work as hard as we can to be the best we can be. However, what I am saying (and as we've all observerd) is that not all of us have the ability to attain this goal.
     
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Here's an example in nature that most are familiar. The bumblebee can't fly based on the laws of physics. It doesn't have the ability to fly. Obviously it does fly. I guess someone forgot to tell them or they didn't listen. Regardless of what one can personally do, it is a disservice to students to tell them not everyone has the ability to reach DHC. I believe it is less ability and more tenacity that will get one to DHC. :thumbsup:
     
  6. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Maybe it's just semantics. And I agree that we should encourage people to work as hard as they can to reach their goals.

    But isn't is more of a "disservice" to say that anyone can play a DHC? This means that the majority of trumpet players out there must be failures, because the majority of trumpet players can not play a DHC.

    The bumblebee metaphore doesn't exactly apply. I think what you're trying to say is that a person should strive to reach whatever goal they set. I agree with you. But the reality is that most of us won't reach this particular goal (the DHC).

    For example, I speak to young people all the time who want to become physicians. I do whatever I can to encourage them in this dream. But I also warn them that they have chosen a difficult path. This is because most people who try to get into medical school will not succeed. This doesn't mean they shouldn't try or that we shouldn't encourage them to try. But it would be cruel to tell the thousands of people who failed that anyone can get into medical school (ie, anyone can hit a DHC).
     
  7. fraserhutch

    fraserhutch Mezzo Piano User

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    I think there is a semantic difference here - is it possible that a significant number of those who fail to make it into medical school not not because they lack innate ability but perhaps because they didn't apply themselves sufficiently, or perhaps were unprepared for what was required?

    The fact is, a significant majority of trumpet players will not play a double C. Why?
    - lack of desire.
    - lack of will to put the required work in, lack of discipline and drive.
    - lack of direction, unfocused practice habits, etc.

    None of the above cannot be be overcome if there is sufficient will.

    Now, I agree that there may be some physiological factors in place that may get in the way, specifically in the area of orthodontics, but barring that, I now believe the ability to play a double C is a skill, not a talent. It may just take some of us a huge amount of work to get there.

     
  8. nieuwguyski

    nieuwguyski Forte User

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    If that was all you had said, you'd have a point. But let's put the above statement in context:

    I guess I'm just soft in the head, because I could swear you're strongly implying -- to the point of claiming -- something in the above statement.

    There are even more jobs for political spokespeople who are similarly expert at stating, "I never claimed..."
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I've slammed out enough DHC's to let me die happy, but I've never been able to slam-dunk a basketball.

    I don't care that I can't do a decent layup, nor dribble around a defender nor have a jump-shot. I don't care about awareness or strategy or even being coachable.

    I wanna jam that puppy home! Any suggestions?
     
  10. craigph

    craigph Piano User

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    Apparently the key to slam-dunk success is complete ignorance of the laws of gravity and being unaware that it is something to work at. Then if you trip , instead of falling to the ground you will float up above the rim and be able to slide that puppy home.
     

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