can finally play marching band music all day :D

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by daniel117, Oct 24, 2012.

  1. daniel117

    daniel117 Pianissimo User

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    Just wanted to post here that not just me but my entire section can play their parts for our 2012 show :D

    Its huge accomplishment because the trumpets have never had to play anything this hard years.

    Also what are your thought on the effects of "forced" marching band on a developing student?

    Here is the last of the show and why im so happy

    http://s17.postimage.org/llcr0d4u7/2012_10_23_11_48_57.jpg
     

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    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
  2. Dave Hughes

    Dave Hughes Mezzo Forte User

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    Keep on playin' :thumbsup::play:
     
  3. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    Is that the hard part?
    the 1st part triplet lick is a major scale arpeggio, the 2nd part of it is lydian (raised 4th) but still just 1-3-5 arpeggio with a raised 4th in there.

    Practice ALL your scales, scale modes, and arpeggios for all of them and you will be sight reading this stuff.

    That's what I hate about music education... They spend all their time teaching tunes instead of teaching you to play the trumpet.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2012
  4. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Okay well I don't like forcing anything on a student. What I have heard from you and a few other youngsters on here seems frankly stupid and actually worries me greatly. Youngsters, children, young people, use which ever monnikker is least offensive, forced to play a trumpet for five hours a day (Band Camp style) at a range and volume that would frighten many a pro cannot be the right way to encourage sensible practice routines. and even you as keen as you obvioulsy are were apparently begining to question equipment, technique, physicality and I don't think it would have been much of a push to see you giving up which would have been a terrible thing.
     
  5. daniel117

    daniel117 Pianissimo User

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    I very much agree with you corn. ive seen a lot of potentially good trumpet players quit because of marching season and i have experienced fatigue from the long hours of playing a day and not just physical fatigue either. My mind has gotten tired and on especially bad day i have questioned whether i should keep on playing or not.

    honestly i prefer concert season above marching, but i like to make the best of what ive got
     
  6. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    Rarely, do I offer any advice, but when you get really tired at the end of your session, play it down an octave. Players of all ages can and do damage themselves when you don't make an adjustment when fatigued. Feeling pain in your chops is a very sure sign you might hurt yourself. Save it for performance and remember there is safety in numbers.
    I am darn glad marching band was not a big deal back in the 60s when I was in high school. We marched only on specific occasions and since our band director absolutely HATED to have his musicians out there in the first place, we stayed with marches. The only time we might play something that had any real range issues was when we were standing still in formation on the football field.
    Some of the music (if you call it that) I've seen these kids being forced to play is just plain nonsense. It is no wonder marching bands can destroy a kid's enjoyment of being in a band.
    Rich T.
     
  7. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

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    Our shows in High School have destroyed some chops. We've marched Carmina Burana and O Fortuna, not something known as brass friendly. In college though, the shows are shorter and the leads switch out quite a bit, because there are notes from High D to Double Bb. It is all about survival.
     
  8. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    I think you make a very good point by seperating mental and physical fatigue Dan, both are very much to be avoided. I know earlier this year I played in my first and I hope only Brass Band contest (I try to stick to non contesting bands) and by the time we got to the day I was so tired of playing a couple of the pieces I almost couldn't be bothered with them.
     
  9. Dave Hughes

    Dave Hughes Mezzo Forte User

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    I've already posted my HS Marching Band story...But, you know, play wherever, whenever you can!
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    IMO anyone that can play any musical instrument ALL day isn't human. I've always been taught that a day comprises 24 hours, part in the light and part in the darkness. Well, too, I've yet to see any song that would take that long to play. I'll be honest, it would be impossible for me to wave my my light weight little conductor's baton that long ... now or in the prime of my life. Currently, when I practice, I alternate with max of 30 minutes "lip time" (playing) and 15 minutes rest, and even so my trumpet part of most music includes many short rests and quite often many measures where other instruments carry the song along.

    There once was a 4 hour movie and what did the audience say, "... it was too long". An opera? Thankfully, such are broken into acts and yet theinstrumentalists share the music with extensive vocals neither of which are continuous. Truthfully, I can count on my fingers the number of operas I've attended in my lifetime and have little desire to attend another ... but never, never would I want to be an instrumentalist for one.
     

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