can finally play marching band music all day :D

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by daniel117, Oct 24, 2012.

  1. Eswany33

    Eswany33 New Friend

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    Aug 22, 2012
    North Carolina, USA
    I sometimes will switch to a Kelly mouthpiece during band camp just to keep my lips less sore.
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Kelly's are quite satisfactory for some players, moreso in frigid weather conditions. I'll not say anything detrimental about a band camp as I never attended one and/or had the need to ... or could afford to ... and yet I do feel they are "overkill". What's to say one would not advance in skills were they to diligently practice at home?
     
  3. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

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    Huntsville, Texas
    It is hard to learn your sets for marching band at home.


    And beyond that it gives players a chance to learn from high quality teachers and to grow among other players. I went to one with Thomas Hooten, not only was he a great teacher but I learned a lot from the other players as well.
     
  4. Eswany33

    Eswany33 New Friend

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    Aug 22, 2012
    North Carolina, USA
    I was talking about marching band camp, I agree that practicing at home is the best way to improve.
     
  5. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

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    Better than taking lessons from a more educated individual? I think not.
     
  6. Eswany33

    Eswany33 New Friend

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    Aug 22, 2012
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    No, lessons are definitely better than just practicing by yourself. You have to find the balance between practice and instruction.
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The curricula vitae of my high school band director who was also my private tutor exceeded any who were my professors or instructors in college. Too, I'd acclaim him to be equal or better than any I know of today.

    To prep for the first football field marching, the high school band had just two 2 hour sessions on different days just before school began. To say the least, we all knew which was our left foot that first game, and from our stadium seats we performed the opening song to begin the game and again to close the game we played a song now banned in U.S. public schools. Can any TMers name the closing song we played? Yes, we were granted special copyright license to play it, and I now have mechanical copyright license to produce it on 50 CDs.

    Yes, that first seasonal football game, while we played marches, we marched through military formation and maneuvers and did not produce a choreographed half time show. However, I remember one of the best shows was simply a number of the players dancing a waltz with the flag twirlers and majorettes while they continued to play. Seemed kind of silly to see a Sousaphone player dance and play, but he did and it wasn't me that time. I only played a Sousaphone 3 times in high school, and one of those times was my solo at my senior band concert where I doubled on trumpet and Sousaphone for parts of The Stars and Stripes, Forever!
     
  8. mattc

    mattc Pianissimo User

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    Dec 12, 2009
    California
    My thoughts on HS marching band are mixed.

    From someone who never even tried to go pro, so take that into strong consideration:

    If you are certain you want to do music as a lifetime career, get out of marching band. Your time is better spent elsewhere. Not much of a career for a marching band musician. The hours spent on the field would be better spent working on improving your craft. And that's the catch, isn't it--would you have the discipline to work on trumpet for those hours if the time were freed up?

    That said, marching band can be a lot of fun. I still have friends from band, lo these many years later. Music in general, and marching band is a big part of that, helped to keep a lot of kids on the right track. A lot of talented kids I knew screwed up their lives royally--but none of them were in band.

    Learning to march vs. learning to improvise. Which will take you farther? Learning to march or sitting in a youth orchestra? Learning to play the same tune over and over and over and over really really loud or learning to sight read and working up audition pieces...which will get you further?

    But--if you don't have the discipline to devote your time to practice instead of field rehearsals, or if you aren't focused on going pro, go ahead and march.

    My old high school put a requirement on marching band too. You had to march if you were going to play a marching band instrument anywhere else. It's the sort of "requirement" that doesn't stand up to the law, but no one challenged it. Today the rules are different. Marching band costs so much that you have to pay to belong and they can't force anyone to pay. (I don't think they can exclude you from band if you don't pay either, but that's another legal question).
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The costs of being in a high school band do vary. Some schools provide only the Sousaphones, tubas, baritones, French horns, Xlyophones, and bass drum, and the student's parents have to acquire all other instruments. Some also require the students parents pay for weekly dry cleaning of the uniforms. Such is justified when school budgets don't allocate more. It's simple, you pay or don't play and there is no law against it.

    True, it wasn't so when I was in high school. First, we had two community dry cleaners that volunteered to clean our uniforms free (they alternated weeks), second we had a terrific band boosters club that raised money from concessions at football, and basketball games for the band, and we had nearly 10 pages of business cards sold in each of our four concert programs plus admission fees and lastly we had major corporation donations. Too, I'm very proud of my home town's music hall where not only our band concerts were played, but our high school drama club and elementary schools put on their productions, as such was a gift to our community by Andrew Carnegie See Http://www.carnegiecarnegie.org

    Too, our high school band played all the music for the inaugural of then PA Governor James Duff, who subsequently became a U.S. Senator from PA. There wasn't any sour notes from professional musicians about this, and two male members or two females were booked into a hotel room and the meals we were served we're yummy. All we got for this performance was a tour of the PA state capitol and each a copy of the History of Pennsylvania autographed by Governor Duff, but the books were delivered about a month afterward.

    Well, you all know that there aren't that many big band events now, and even so our band was divided into two parts for the Inaugural Ball, and I was playing in that half that played from 11 PM to 1 AM with a 1/2 hour break.

    Sadly, my high school doesn't exist anymore having merged with two other jurisdictions.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2012
  10. mattc

    mattc Pianissimo User

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    Dec 12, 2009
    California
    "It's simple, you pay or don't play and there is no law against it."

    Depends on where you live. In California, one can't require payment:

    "Pay-to-Play" at Schools Has Some Crying "Foul!" - Lawyers.com

     

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